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posted 2 months ago by
titewad
Senior Member - 8K

Cut the cord and get rid of cable TV, get all the UHF broadcast networks for free in 1080 HD quality.  Save yourself $60-$100 a month.

Edit 10/17 8:38am another price drop $12.87.

WalMart has it cheaper now, $13.25.  https://www.walmart.com/ip/Eagle-Aspen-DTV2BUHF-DirecTV-Approved-2-Bay-UHF-Outdoor-Antenna/21152494 

Original deal was at Home depot for $16.97 (now $13.86)  http://www.homedepot.com/p/Eagle-Aspen-2-Bay-UHF-Outdoor-Antenna... 

UHF channels 14-69.

Includes weatherproof balun.

DirectTV approved.

Free ship to store.

This model has been as much as $50 in the past and is around $23 plus shipping at most other retailers now.

I bought this and tried to use it indoors.  I got the same channels as an amplified Winegard Flatwave which is an indoor antenna, but then I put it outside and got even more channels that were in my local market (37 miles) and operate at low power.  When I turned it around 180 degrees I got channels that are ~60 miles away in another market.  Tvfool.com said those channels should not come in or would require extreme measures to receive.  It also received the local VHF-high channels 8 and up, but not the single VHF-high channel in the market 60 miles away.  It is semi-directional with an 80 degree field of reception so you should aim it in the direction of the broadcast towers but if they are not all in the same direction, you might still receive them all, provided they are within 80 degrees of each other.  It's advertised with a 35 mile range, but I get all the UHF stations in a second market that is 60 miles away.  YMMV on reception, there are a lot of variables including obstacles, terrain and weather so you may or may not get 60 miles range out of it, but all of the signals I receive are 2 edge, not line of sight, so I'm pretty happy with it.  The Winegard Flatwave antenna that I'm comparing it to only receives the full power primary market channels that are 37 miles away, not the low power channels, and it doesn't get the channels that are 60 miles away in the secondary market.

Indoor vs. outdoor use. This antenna is marketed as an outdoor antenna. It will work indoors, but reception will be impeded, like all antennas, by building materials. I found that the foil backing of rigid wall insulation interferes with the signals permeating the walls of my home. Likewise, metal window screens also interfere. The full power signals get through, but not reduced power signals or distant signals. Even in the attic, where there is no foil backed insulation, reception was reduced. If you live closer to the broadcast towers than I do, you may get away with an attic or living room installation. I'm just too far away to do that to be able to receive low power signals. It's not a huge antenna so an outdoor installation won't be much of an eyesore and if you already have a J-pole from using a satellite Dish, just mount it to that pole and you're done. The antenna comes with a pole clamp. You can get a J-pole cheap from Home Depot, or if you're not in a hurry watch craigslist. People give away unwanted satellite dishes and many include the poles, snag one up if available.

Most people are not aware that there are multiple ranges of frequencies for TV broadcasts, VHF-low (channels 2-6) 54-88MHz, VHF-high (channels 7-13) 174-216MHz, and UHF (channels 14-51) 470-698 MHz. The VHF frequencies are long wave, meaning they require a long antenna to pick them up. If you've seen a rooftop antenna and noticed long aluminum arms at the back end of the antenna, that get longer as you go further back, they are the VHF elements.  Also, there are real frequencies (RF) and virtual frequencies (VF), which means that if a station originally broadcast on VHF channel 3 when broadcasts were analog, but after the digital transition they switched to UHF channel 34 and they want to keep the original channel number, they use VF channel 3 so that is what is displayed on your TV, even though they are not really broadcasting on channel 3 anymore. Nearly all TV stations moved up to UHF when switching to digital, but not all, and if your market still has VHF broadcasts, you may have difficulty receiving them with this antenna, if you can get them at all. Check all the channels in your area here: TVFool.com, and if any of the channels you are interested in viewing are between RF 2 and RF 13, you might have to get a rabbit ear antenna or one of the big outdoor antennas, depending on how far away from the broadcast towers you are. There is no difference in antennas for digital vs. analog transmissions. They operate on the same frequencies, only the signal encoding has changed. The old rabbit ears and giant rooftop antennas still work just fine. Your TV's tuner is what changed to decode the digital signal. If you've never used an antenna before, you can not get cable stations using an antenna, only broadcast TV stations, ABC, CBS, CW, FOX, ION, NBC, PBS, TBN, Telemundo and Univision are the major networks and most broadcast sub-channels in addition to the main channel which is usually another network like AccuWeather, America One, Antenna TV, Bounce, Buzzr, Classic Arts Showcase, Comet, Cozi, Create, Decades, Escape, France 24, Get TV, Grit, Heroes and Icons, HSN, Justice Network, Laff TV, Live Well, Me TV, MHz, Mind, Movies!, MyNet, NHK World, Qubo, QVC, Retro TV, Russia Today, Soul of the South, The Works, This TV, Tuff TV, V-me, Youtoo America, etc..

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rated:
UHF is still a thing?

rated:
swandown said:   UHF is still a thing?
  
Most digital broadcasts in my area are in the UHF bands.

rated:
WalMart had this priced higher than Home Depot when I originally posted this deal, but they dropped the price on this antenna to $13.25 which is now lower than Home Depot's price: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Eagle-Aspen-DTV2BUHF-DirecTV-Approved-2-Bay-UHF-Outdoor-Antenna/21152494, free ship to store.

This antenna gets the most reception when mounted outdoors, but will work indoors, too.  It just won't get low power signals and distant signals when used indoors.  Not a problem if you are located close to the transmitters.

rated:
Recently tried a friend's suggestion. A very cable cutter moment. I had some spare coaxial cable lying around and cut one end off and stripped back to reveal 6 inches of the center copper core wire. In my case it was the older cable where the central wire was just surrounded by a plastic sheath with no braided wire for shielding. Anyway, long story short, I connected the wire to the tv and stuck the bare wire next to a window in the back Courtyard
between other 10 story buildings in NYC and ran the search program for Antenna instead of cable as signal source and TADA I got 67 channels! Truly a cable cutting moment! YMMV

rated:
brusbrother said:   Recently tried a friend's suggestion. A very cable cutter moment. I had some spare coaxial cable lying around and cut one end off and stripped back to reveal 6 inches of the center copper core wire. In my case it was the older cable where the central wire was just surrounded by a plastic sheath with no braided wire for shielding. Anyway, long story short, I connected the wire to the tv and stuck the bare wire next to a window in the back Courtyard 
between other 10 story buildings in NYC and ran the search program for Antenna instead of cable as signal source and TADA I got 67 channels! Truly a cable cutting moment! YMMV

  
That will work if you are close to the broadcast towers, and in NYC you are probably a mile or two away, but those of us who are much further away need a directional antenna.  I'm pretty happy with the Eagle aspen, it exceeded my expectations.

rated:
I live in CT and purchased a Terk brand amplified indoor antenna spec'd for 60 mile range that go almost no channels. Thinking there was a bad amplifier, I eliminated the amplifier and got many channels using just the antenna portion. I called Terk and their tech said that since I was about 50 miles from the source, the antenna was too strong. WTF?? I returned the damn thing to WalMart and was gifted something that looks like to the one mentioned here (not amplified right?) mounted on my rooftop and in the winter when the trees have shed their leaves, I get some pretty good reception out of NY. BUT I also get some pretty good reception with the bare wire. Try it and see if it works for you. After all we are FWers
Certainly this unit is priced right! Green for op.

rated:
swandown said:   UHF is still a thing?
  
Yes.  Your mobile phone uses UHF.  All radio waves between 300 Mhz and 3000 Mhz (3 Ghz) are UHF. 

With the switch to digital TV broadcasting, you have to check each channel individually now to find out what frequency/band it uses.  The TV channel numbers are virtual now, and may be identical to the radio channel, or far from it.  For example, in one city (Washington, DC), Channel 4 is broadcast on RF channel 48 (674-680 Mhz, UHF), Channel 5 is broadcast on RF channel 36 (602-608 Mhz, UHF), Channel 7 is really broadcast on RF Channel 7 (174-180 Mhz, VHF), Channel 9 is really broadcast on RFChannel 9 (VHF) , etc. 



 

rated:
Price drop, $12.87.

rated:
I have the 4 bay version of this antenna in my attic. l am located 30 miles from most towers. The terrain isn't flat. I get most of the UHF stations well.

This 2 bay antenna should be good if the broadcast towers are 15 miles or less away.

Placement of the antenna can be tricky. I hung it on the a wall at my last place and got all of the channels. If I moved 6 inches either way, I would loose some of channels.

I have a rabbit ear antenna connected with this antenna using a combiner (splitter reversed) to get one of the VHF stations.

rated:
donbene said:   I have the 4 bay version of this antenna in my attic. l am located 30 miles from most towers. The terrain isn't flat. I get most of the UHF stations well.

This 2 bay antenna should be good if the broadcast towers are 15 miles or less away.

Placement of the antenna can be tricky. I hung it on the a wall at my last place and got all of the channels. If I moved 6 inches either way, I would loose some of channels.

I have a rabbit ear antenna connected with this antenna using a combiner (splitter reversed) to get one of the VHF stations.

  You lose a lot of signal indoors, including attics.  Outdoors, even with no line of sight towers, just two edge signals, I am getting 60 mile reception.  Indoors, I get full power stations from 37 miles away.

rated:
Back in stock.

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