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posted 2 months ago by
wtjc
Senior Member

Gatehouse Satin Nickel Single-Cylinder Motorized Electronic Entry Door Deadbolt with Keypad Item # 788482 Model # GCX2D01   
 
As of 1/11/2016  stores with $17 price has grown to 18  many others at $28

Others with varying discounts

Quite of few of the stores have multiples in stock. Great time to snag extra savings with coupon

I have no idea of the quality of these.- your on your own   (Lowes brand  - I have never tried them)

Still some real bargains   Updated Jan 11  Discount list keeps changing  (some sold out but other new ones keep getting added)

If you missed out before check again




 

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rated:
what are the zip codes of the stores?

rated:
When it fails to work....then what?

rated:
anandamanandam said:   what are the zip codes of the stores?
  Open the Lowes page showing the electronic lock and click on the box where it says:  "check other stores".   Put your zip in there

rated:
Do you know something about these locks that I don't?      When I said "your on your own" it only meant that I have no personal knowledge or experience with these locks.  Lowes does stand behind their products.  Personally I'd return it.

rated:
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  Use the key

rated:
exmiuwu said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  Use the key

You carry a key around just in case the keypad fails? That defeats the whole purpose of having a keypad!

In reality, you would be standing there, cursing, with the key somewhere inside the house. Hope you have another way in...

Personally, I like the KISS principle.

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
exmiuwu said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  Use the key

You carry a key around just in case the keypad fails? That defeats the whole purpose of having a keypad!

In reality, you would be standing there, cursing, with the key somewhere inside the house. Hope you have another way in...

Personally, I like the KISS principle.

  
This is great for allowing access to kids who lose keys, or if they step out without them.  I installed one in my last garage to make sure that I could always get in the house if I was working in my yard and someone locked the door.  I used it for more than 10 years without a single problem.

There are people out there with different needs than yours.  

rated:
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

rated:
I have an electronic deadbolt on our basement storage room.   Keeps the "kids" out of my reloading area.   Wife and I know the code AND where we have hidden a key.

rated:
the cheapest around me is $41.

rated:
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
exmiuwu said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  Use the key

You carry a key around just in case the keypad fails? That defeats the whole purpose of having a keypad!

In reality, you would be standing there, cursing, with the key somewhere inside the house. Hope you have another way in...

Personally, I like the KISS principle.

  Hide a key around back.  We have two similar devices and will never go back.  They've NEVER failed.

rated:
Looks great, sadly $69 at all nearby stores here (NW Philly Burbs).

rated:
I saw this on the shelf today in Stafford, VA 22406 for $24. It looked like a nice lock. They had a couple still left at that price.

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 
 

rated:
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

rated:
Manahawkin nj 08050 shows 3, $27.60

rated:
Got the 2 in Mobile. Thanks OP

rated:
anandamanandam said:   what are the zip codes of the stores?
  
They each have different zip codes. LOOK THEM UP AND TELL US.

rated:
How can I use this?

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

  any of the Iris branded stuff works fine with Smarthings.   The API is completely open, so you can use any proximity sensor you want, including the phone to trip the lock.   
 

rated:
Dumb question, does it matter if the front door has the knob on the left side or the right side of the door? Doesn't say on the page whether this works for either side...

Seeing it for $41 or $27 depending on store in Austin, TX....78717

rated:
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

  any of the Iris branded stuff works fine with Smarthings.   The API is completely open, so you can use any proximity sensor you want, including the phone to trip the lock.   

  But you still need a Hub (Iris in this case) to talk to the phone, as far as I can tell. The lock would need the hardware to talk directly to the phone via Bluetooth or IR, so adding software to the current Smartlocks would not do the trick.
Using the internet for communication is really not reliable enough. The lock needs to work as a standalone unit.

rated:
Should work for both (but I'm not familiar with this particular lock)

Lowes will always take it back though (just return within 90 days with receipt)

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

  any of the Iris branded stuff works fine with Smarthings.   The API is completely open, so you can use any proximity sensor you want, including the phone to trip the lock.   

  But you still need a Hub (Iris in this case) to talk to the phone, as far as I can tell. The lock would need the hardware to talk directly to the phone via Bluetooth or IR, so adding software to the current Smartlocks would not do the trick.
Using the internet for communication is really not reliable enough. The lock needs to work as a standalone unit.

  You do need a hub, but not an iris hub.  Any smarthings hub will work.  The same will be true of any Zwave or Zigbee product.   You can't have stand-alone and IOT at the same time, and most people prefer to have things interconnected.   The current Smarthngs hub doesn't require internet to work. 

rated:
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

  any of the Iris branded stuff works fine with Smarthings.   The API is completely open, so you can use any proximity sensor you want, including the phone to trip the lock.   

  But you still need a Hub (Iris in this case) to talk to the phone, as far as I can tell. The lock would need the hardware to talk directly to the phone via Bluetooth or IR, so adding software to the current Smartlocks would not do the trick.
Using the internet for communication is really not reliable enough. The lock needs to work as a standalone unit.

  You do need a hub, but not an iris hub.  Any smarthings hub will work.  The same will be true of any Zwave or Zigbee product.   You can't have stand-alone and IOT at the same time, and most people prefer to have things interconnected.   The current Smarthngs hub doesn't require internet to work. 

  Exactly. Not good enough yet. Power failure=lockout, unless you remember the codes.
Also, no hardware support for proximity sensors. The phone would also have to somehow talk to the hub, which requires internet. 

Maybe in a few years, but this stuff isn't mature yet.

rated:
Key opens in 10 seconds using a lock pick gun.

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

  any of the Iris branded stuff works fine with Smarthings.   The API is completely open, so you can use any proximity sensor you want, including the phone to trip the lock.   

  But you still need a Hub (Iris in this case) to talk to the phone, as far as I can tell. The lock would need the hardware to talk directly to the phone via Bluetooth or IR, so adding software to the current Smartlocks would not do the trick.
Using the internet for communication is really not reliable enough. The lock needs to work as a standalone unit.

  You do need a hub, but not an iris hub.  Any smarthings hub will work.  The same will be true of any Zwave or Zigbee product.   You can't have stand-alone and IOT at the same time, and most people prefer to have things interconnected.   The current Smarthngs hub doesn't require internet to work. 

  Exactly. Not good enough yet. Power failure=lockout, unless you remember the codes.
Also, no hardware support for proximity sensors. The phone would also have to somehow talk to the hub, which requires internet. 

Maybe in a few years, but this stuff isn't mature yet.

  
The place where I work has system that use biometric device (scan employee hand) or proxy card to unlock doors.  And the system is backed by batteries in case of power outage,  But we do have one emergency door that use mechanical numeric door lock just in case since it could happen.  But we are talking about $41 here.  With just $41 dollars, it make life a little more convenience when compare with Key only lock.  I really do not see why not.  

rated:
po90260 said:   Key opens in 10 seconds using a lock pick gun.
  So do most other locks.  Two seconds I can break a window.  On most homes 1/2 hour and I can go right through the wall.  Only takes that long because I'm old and slow.   No lock is safe.  Some are just a little safer than others.

Am I the only one that thinks some are making the purchase of a simple time saving device too complicated

This type of lock has been used for years with few problems.  It's a steal at this price and makes life a lot more convenient 

This one is motorized meaning battery power retracts the bolt for you   (batteries do not last quite as long)

Others are not motorized.  Instead of battery power retracting and setting the bolt you do it manually by simply twisting a knob.  (batteries last a little longer with this one)  Not a big deal with either one

Since I've been using this type of lock I've probably paid for it already with the savings and inconvenience of having to purchase new keys that were forever getting lost, worn out or broken. 

You also have the smart locks everyone is talking about (much more expensive)  

This is a simple inexpensive lock that looks nice and makes  life a little easier.  Like I said I'm too old and slow anymore to climb through a window when I get locked out. 

 

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
drodge said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
BricRoth said:   
belgique said:   When it fails to work....then what?
  This is the same point raised as gun safes moved to electronic.  They work very well as long as you replace the battery when you get the warning.   No one will carry a key of any kind in 10 years.   This tech has really come along in the last 5 years!  

BTW my Lowes show $41.70...typical Lowes Roulette wheel

  It's still got a long way to go. 
What we really need are Bluetooth or RFI deadbolts, that are activated by proximity to your phone. Your phone becomes the key, and the door disarms automatically when you get within 2 feet. Just like starting keyless cars where you only have to carry the key in your pocket. I'm not sure why that tech hasn't migrated from cars to doors yet.
Touch the handle, and the door unlocks. If anyone else tries to open the door, the alarm goes off.

This system would be far easier to use, and much more weatherproof. No more buttons to expose to sun and corrosion.

However, it needs to be foolproof. No software glitches allowed.

  You can do that today with SmartThings and any supported lock.  The alarm thing doesn't exactly work as you describe, but you can definitely arm and disarm the alarm and unlock the door. 

  Interesting. Maybe this is why the stuff from Lowes is on sale here. It's getting obsolete.

The Smarthings locks aren't there yet, though. You can unlock the door with your phone, but you need to run an app for that. It really needs to be a automatic proximity lock. Nobody wants to fiddle with their phone to run an app to unlock the door.
It also needs to be totally independent of internet access. You don't want the door locks to fail if WiFi (or the Smarthings Hub) stops working. Something as simple as a power failure would lock you out of your home. Of course, you could still use the keypad (if you remember the code), but the whole point is that the keypad shouldn't be needed. The door should unlock automatically.

  any of the Iris branded stuff works fine with Smarthings.   The API is completely open, so you can use any proximity sensor you want, including the phone to trip the lock.   

  But you still need a Hub (Iris in this case) to talk to the phone, as far as I can tell. The lock would need the hardware to talk directly to the phone via Bluetooth or IR, so adding software to the current Smartlocks would not do the trick.
Using the internet for communication is really not reliable enough. The lock needs to work as a standalone unit.

  You do need a hub, but not an iris hub.  Any smarthings hub will work.  The same will be true of any Zwave or Zigbee product.   You can't have stand-alone and IOT at the same time, and most people prefer to have things interconnected.   The current Smarthngs hub doesn't require internet to work. 

  Exactly. Not good enough yet. Power failure=lockout, unless you remember the codes.
Also, no hardware support for proximity sensors. The phone would also have to somehow talk to the hub, which requires internet. 

Maybe in a few years, but this stuff isn't mature yet.

  You seem intent on ignoring the facts.   I'm doing exactly what you describe today with an off-the-shelf lock from Lowes and a smarthings hub.  I don't take my phone out of my pocket.  It detects my presence and unlocks the door. My system doesn't require internet access at all. The hub doesn't need to connect to the internet whatsoever.   Yes, the hub requires power, but a cheap UPS solves power issues and I have my router and modem on an UPS anyway.  No powered lock is going to work without power, so you can make the same argument about the batteries going dead.  Nothing is perfect, it's about convenience vs cost.  Yes, you could build all the features you're talking about into the lock itself and not require a hub at all.  One, it would cost a lot more to do so.  Two, you'd lose all the benefits of the hub architecture - being able to lock and unlock the door remotely, automation schemes, tying in with other devices, not having to configure each lock separately.  I think most people would much prefer those benefits over an integrated  system and not having a hub.   

As others have said, this is a $25 lock.  You aren't going to get the features you're talking any time soon in that price range.  

rated:
$69 in Lansing

rated:
sartor said:   $69 in Lansing
  Four stores In MI  have it for $27Saginaw, MI                                      1             $27.60   Niles, MI                                            3             $27.60   Gaylord, MI                                       2             $27.60   Frenchtown Township, MI                1             $27.60   

11 others have it for less than $69.00

rated:
wtjc said:   
sartor said:   $69 in Lansing
  Four stores In MI  have it for $27Saginaw, MI                                      1             $27.60   Niles, MI                                            3             $27.60   Gaylord, MI                                       2             $27.60   Frenchtown Township, MI                1             $27.60   

11 others have it for less than $69.00

  
Any chance you can check MD and NY (Long Island) too? Thanks!

rated:
PsychoFan said:   
wtjc said:   
sartor said:   $69 in Lansing
  Four stores In MI  have it for $27Saginaw, MI                                      1             $27.60   Niles, MI                                            3             $27.60   Gaylord, MI                                       2             $27.60   Frenchtown Township, MI                1             $27.60   

11 others have it for less than $69.00

  
Any chance you can check MD and NY (Long Island) too? Thanks!

  MD Hagerstown, MD               1             $27.60  
Pocomoke City, MD                   2             $37.95  
Westminster, MD                       1             $41.40  
Allegany, MD                             2             $41.40  
N. Frederick, MD                       5             $41.40  
Severn, MD                               6             $41.40  
N. Hagerstown, MD                  1             $41.40  
La Plata, MD                            4             $41.40  
New Carrollton, MD                 2             $41.40  
NYSpringville, NY                   1             $17.25  
Patchogue, NY                       4             $27.60  
Hornell, NY                             5             $31.05    
S. Staten Island, NY               5             $41.40  
N.W. Staten Island, NY          1             $41.40 

rated:
PsychoFan said:   
wtjc said:   
sartor said:   $69 in Lansing
  Four stores In MI  have it for $27Saginaw, MI                                      1             $27.60   Niles, MI                                            3             $27.60   Gaylord, MI                                       2             $27.60   Frenchtown Township, MI                1             $27.60   

11 others have it for less than $69.00

  
Any chance you can check MD and NY (Long Island) too? Thanks!

Hagerstown, MD 1 $27.60
Pocomoke City, MD 2 $37.95
Westminster, MD 1 $41.40
Allegany, MD 2 $41.40
N. Frederick, MD 5 $41.40
La Plata, MD 4 $41.40
Severn, MD 6 $41.40
N. Hagerstown, MD 1 $41.40
New Carrollton, MD 2 $41.40
S. Staten Island, NY 5 $41.40
N.W. Staten Island, NY 1 $41.40


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