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posted 15 days ago by
Giwo
New Member

Lowes has their Kobalt 24v 1.5ah lithium ion battery pack for $10. I bought one hoping to repack a pair of 12v (actually 10.8) hitachi packs I had that went bad. The pack had 6 Samsung 1500mah 18650 cells inside. The hitachi packs were 1.5ah also, so I replaced the cells and both packs charged and are working well. The kobalt battery is easy to open too, as it is only screwed together.

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Linky

10 bucks for a li-ion battery pack...sure makes the other overpriced packs seem...well...overpriced.

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Great deal for someone (like me) that plans to build a battery pack for a bike.  I bought like 20 of them.  This deal has been going on for a long time now.

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Solid combo package! Thanks

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sesquipedalian said:   Great deal for someone (like me) that plans to build a battery pack for a bike.  I bought like 20 of them.  This deal has been going on for a long time now.
For your application, you'd be better off getting the 3000mAh ones, twice the capacity in the same size. Granted, $/W.hr, the 1500 ones would be cheaper.

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Samsung... Lithium ion batteries...
:-D

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1500 mAh is pretty low.

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Good deals, in for one, thanks.

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TellyTubby said:   1500 mAh is pretty low.
  True, that's like 36 watt-hours.  However, if you just have a big box of these things and keep them charged all the time, I could see it being pretty useful.

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I will pick one up and print this adapter. Not much of a metal worker so I will likely need to get someone to help me with the metal bits.
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1914299

Any thoughts on using a few in series for a power wheels car?

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TY OP!
Something to play with

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AnandBanned said:   I will pick one up and print this adapter. Not much of a metal worker so I will likely need to get someone to help me with the metal bits.
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1914299 

Any thoughts on using a few in series for a power wheels car?

As long as you hit the right voltage for the motor you should be in good shape.

That said, if you don't really know what you're doing with batteries when charging and discharging them, you could blow things up in a spectacular fashion and injure a child using said power-wheels car, so please do some homework on how to work with Li-Ion cells. 

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Keep in mind that Amp Hour ratings mean more than how long it will last. A 1.5mA battery will not have the power that a 4mA batter does. Power is watts. Watts is Amps times volts. It also depends on how the batteries are built and the max "C" rating. A 4mA battery may not have 4x the power as a 1mA, but you will likely notice if you are cutting hardwood, drilling big holes, driving long screws, etc.

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great announcement! thanks for sharing.

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Do these have a built-in charge controller (can use a generic charger), or do they rely on the charger to protect them?

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Has anyone ever repowered any 19.2V craftsman tools? Would be interested to hear...

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CTYankee said:   Keep in mind that Amp Hour ratings mean more than how long it will last. A 1.5mA battery will not have the power that a 4mA batter does. Power is watts. Watts is Amps times volts. It also depends on how the batteries are built and the max "C" rating. A 4mA battery may not have 4x the power as a 1mA, but you will likely notice if you are cutting hardwood, drilling big holes, driving long screws, etc.
  
Okay, no offense, but you don't have the faintest clue what you are talking about.  Power is indeed watts, which (assuming DC) is voltage * current (amps).  Amp Hour is a measure not of current, or power, or energy, but of charge, just like coulomb (the SI unit of charge).  The battery is rated as 1500mAH, meaning it can supply 1500mA for an hour, or 500mA for 3 hours or X amps for Y hours where X*Y=1.5.  (Note that AH ratings are typically rated with a continuous draw of AH/10 or AH/20, etc), so high current applications may give shorter run times than they would otherwise appear.  So, yes a 1500mAH battery may last less than half a 3000mAH battery, but there is no reason to believe that a 1500mAH battery can't source the same amount current as a 3000mAH while its charged.

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hpmax said:   
CTYankee said:   Keep in mind that Amp Hour ratings mean more than how long it will last. A 1.5mA battery will not have the power that a 4mA batter does. Power is watts. Watts is Amps times volts. It also depends on how the batteries are built and the max "C" rating. A 4mA battery may not have 4x the power as a 1mA, but you will likely notice if you are cutting hardwood, drilling big holes, driving long screws, etc.
  
Okay, no offense, but you don't have the faintest clue what you are talking about.  Power is indeed watts, which (assuming DC) is voltage * current (amps).  Amp Hour is a measure not of current, or power, or energy, but of charge, just like coulomb (the SI unit of charge).  The battery is rated as 1500mAH, meaning it can supply 1500mA for an hour, or 500mA for 3 hours or X amps for Y hours where X*Y=1.5.  (Note that AH ratings are typically rated with a continuous draw of AH/10 or AH/20, etc), so high current applications may give shorter run times than they would otherwise appear.  So, yes a 1500mAH battery may last less than half a 3000mAH battery, but there is no reason to believe that a 1500mAH battery can't source the same amount current as a 3000mAH while its charged.

  No offense, taken....but I have much more than a clue. 

You are correct that the capacity determines how long a battery will last under a given load. However that is only part of what capacity determines. 

Another aspect of batter performance that is determined by capacity is how many Amps a battery can produce. Cells are rated for a max load they can handle. If you exceed that load the battery will get very hot and potentially damage itself (and much more possibly). Battery max discharge rates are referred to by the (much abused) "C" rating. Ah rating times "C" rating equals the max amps it can safely output. Not all batteries with the same capacity can deliver the same power. A 4,000 mAh battery capable of 1C can deliver 4A. 2C 8A, 3C 12A...and so on. 

In this case, if these cells are rated at 2C the packs could produce:
1,500mAh = 3A
2,000mAh = 4A
4,000mAh = 8A

As you increase the capacity by adding more cells (or larger cells) you increase the Amps the battery can output. You can also increase the Amp rating by using cells with a higher max discharge (C rating). 

My background for all this is in the RC hobby where brushless motors and Lipo batteries are really pushed to their limits. I have many batteries of the same capacity but VERY different C ratings and the difference is very easy to tell in flight. I have the same cells in different capacities and those too produce different results (though in flight is harder to tell because the added weight reduces the gains from more power). I've done some bench testing with meters and such to graph the differences. Capacity and C rating have an impact on how much power can be delivered to a motor and therefore how many RPM and how much torque the motor can output. 

In the case of power tool batteries the C rating is not that high so the gains with higher capacity packs are not as significant as RC Lipo batteries, but it is still a consideration. 

Here is an article that hints at this with relation to tools: http://toolguyd.com/cordless-power-tool-battery-pack-limits/ 
linked article said: They’re rated at 3.0Ah each, and can withstand continuous current loads of 15A. Other brands have used 2.5Ah and lower capacity batteries with discharge rates of 20A to 25A, but 15A would work well in a higher capacity battery pack because you can achieve up to 30A in theory with coupled battery pairs.

What this means is that we probably won’t see compact battery packs built with the same cells as Bosch’s new 6.0Ah extended capacity battery pack. The higher discharge rating of the current selection of 2.5Ah battery cells is better than for the new 3.0Ah cells.

From here, if battery brands can improve the discharge rate, we might see future compact 3.0Ah battery packs that are powerful enough to work with heavier duty tools, such as saws that you normally pair with higher capacity battery packs.



 

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Any suggestions on the best way to clean up the solder points on each end? Not sure I can safely hit it with a soldering gun to melt them.

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glenatuf said:   Has anyone ever repowered any 19.2V craftsman tools? Would be interested to hear...
 Voltage too low for charger? You can try this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ-Do37BeWQ



I've had to "jump start" a few in a dumb charger to get my smart charger to recognize them.
 

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Look up how to make lipo packs on RCGroups or YouTube. You'll find lots of info on how to safely solder lithium cells.

Probably not worth it though. If the pack works the best you could hope for is a tiny reduction in IR. However you could damage the cell with the soldering heat and you may have a better looking solder but a cell with much higher IR from heat damage.

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Do not use a soldering iron lithium batteries unless you are an expert and have a good iron. You are supposed to weld solder tabs onto cells and then solder to them.

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CTYankee said:   Look up how to make lipo packs on RCGroups or YouTube. You'll find lots of info on how to safely solder lithium cells.

Probably not worth it though. If the pack works the best you could hope for is a tiny reduction in IR. However you could damage the cell with the soldering heat and you may have a better looking solder but a cell with much higher IR from heat damage.

  Thanks. I'll probably just take a file to them. I plan to use them in flashlights. All my batteries were pretty empty when I got them out, but they charged up just fine.

BTW, I did notice they had a 2.0 amp hour pack of the same size for $20. Probably larger amp batteries.

 

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