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posted 3 months ago by
MrClean09
Wacky Member

More deals in the official Staples clearance thread.
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i7-6700T passmark: 9048

  • 180 Watt uATX Regular internal power supply
  • 68% efficiency

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blueribb said:   i7-6700T passmark: 9048

  • 180 Watt uATX Regular internal power supply
  • 68% efficiency


  The PSU is where these companies always go as cheap as possible, since it's a spec that most people don't think to ask about.
180W is about as weak of a PSU as I've ever seen. This machine can't support any decent graphics card, so no running high-powered games on this rig.
My guess is that the case is too small for a dedicated graphics card anyway.

Any home user buying this should ask themselves: What specific app do I need an i7 for? 

You can get a used i5 system with identical specs for approx $100-$150 on eBay. Surfing the net will not be one bit slower, and you will save at least $300. Put some of that towards an SSD, and you will have a computer that's FAR faster than this system, yet costs half as much.
 

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This isn't hot at all, slowww.... computer.

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Not a gamer here. Great deal.

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not a great deal... i7 with a mediocre amount of RAM is totally useless running off a miserably slow (by today's standards) 7200rpm hard disk. And it's probably the cheapest hard drive they can get... which means very little buffer memory.

Anything the i7 would gain you over an i3 or i5 IN THE REAL WORLD (not benchmarks)... would inherently be lost because the hard drive can't keep up.

As noted above... the most miserable power supply, memory, and motherboards usually go into these. Miserable = cheapest = highest failure rates. Even with warranty... when your motherboard goes bad 2 years down the line, you will have to RMA it, send it back to HP, wait 30 days for them to diagnose,fix,and send it back. Huge hassle and they will make you pay return shipping.

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How about instead of debating our subjective opinions, we focus on the potential pros and cons and let Peeps draw their own conclusions? 

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Thanks justanothergeek! This IS a deal just due to the fact that it's an i7 and expandable up to 32gb of RAM. If the PS goes then buy a halfhway decent $50 500 watt PS and replace, easy peasy... I am actually putting in an SSD to replace the HDD and the thing will fly.

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MrClean09 said:   Thanks justanothergeek! This IS a deal just due to the fact that it's an i7 and expandable up to 32gb of RAM. If the PS goes then buy a halfhway decent $50 500 watt PS and replace, easy peasy... I am actually putting in an SSD to replace the HDD and the thing will fly.
  If the PSU goes, it will often take the motherboard/CPU with it, and possibly your drives as well. Nothing easy peasy about that, unfortunately. You need to replace it BEFORE it blows.

              1) Does the case use a standard form factor for the PSU cage? If not, good luck replacing it. This is often an issue with small form factor PC's.
              2) Does the PSU have standard connectors to the motherboard? If not, you have no way of replacing the PSU without a detailed schematic,  and lots of calculations and soldering.
These questions should be answered BEFORE buying, or you may be disappointed.

The i7 capabilities are irrelevant unless you have an app that can benefit from - and is designed for - hyperthreaded operations. I can't think of a single home user app that would benefit in the slightest from an i7. For Microsoft Office, or internet surfing, you can't possibly tell the difference between a third gen i5 and a 6th gen i7. Most games actually perform WORSE with hyperthreading. Only business users will see a benefit, when doing things like 3D rendering.

The times when you needed a new PC every four years to run the newest apps are long gone. An 8 year old PC will run every home use app (besides games) just as well as a new PC. There is a reason why AMD and Intel have pivoted away from making faster CPU's to making more energy-efficient ones. Faster CPU's are simply not needed anymore in the mass market. The SSD is the only thing that really makes a difference in speed.
(note that this DOESN'T apply to GPU's, for games, where performance is everything and nobody cares much about efficiency)

 

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MrClean09 said:   Thanks justanothergeek! This IS a deal just due to the fact that it's an i7 and expandable up to 32gb of RAM. If the PS goes then buy a halfhway decent $50 500 watt PS and replace, easy peasy... I am actually putting in an SSD to replace the HDD and the thing will fly.
  According to HP, the memory is only expandable to 16gb. Here's a page with all the specs for this model:

https://support.hp.com/lamerica_nsc_carib-en/product/hp-pavilion...

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MrClean09 said:   Thanks justanothergeek! This IS a deal just due to the fact that it's an i7 and expandable up to 32gb of RAM. If the PS goes then buy a halfhway decent $50 500 watt PS and replace, easy peasy... I am actually putting in an SSD to replace the HDD and the thing will fly.
  most people walking into Staples are not going to be able to do these things.  Since it probably will not come with an official windows 10 install disk, you will have to clone the OS onto the SSD.

If you can get to this point on your own for the same amount of $...  with how cheap components are these days... you're better off building your own instead of starting with this HP box

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canoeguy1 said:     The PSU is where these companies always go as cheap as possible, since it's a spec that most people don't think to ask about.
180W is about as weak of a PSU as I've ever seen. This machine can't support any decent graphics card, so no running high-powered games on this rig.
My guess is that the case is too small for a dedicated graphics card anyway.

Any home user buying this should ask themselves: What specific app do I need an i7 for? 

You can get a used i5 system with identical specs for approx $100-$150 on eBay. Surfing the net will not be one bit slower, and you will save at least $300. Put some of that towards an SSD, and you will have a computer that's FAR faster than this system, yet costs half as much.

  Yes, companies always go as cheap as possible with PSU and it is a spec that most people do not think about but then again, 99% of people don't care about gaming that requires an add on card.  The 180W power supply is far from the weakest I have ever seen; I have seen a lot of 90 and 130 watt power supplies in my over 25+ of doing IT support.  Packard Bell, Acer  , HPDell and many others have systems that use these small PSU.  There are MANY things that an i7 can help for that a small business or home user use their systems for such as spreadsheets (some get that large), databases (again, some can get large enough to need it), MS Word documents (some people write books at home or it is their profession) and some like to play around with graphics.  In fact, according to Gardner, all of these things are more common uses for a computer than high-end gaming which require more powerful graphics. 

You are right with the price on eBay for an i5 on eBay, that surfing the Internet won't be slower (because that is based upon your ISP and not your computer) and the savings.  As for the SSD, it really depends upon WHAT SSD and its capacity.  There actually are SSDs out there that are slower than the hybrid SSD/platter drives.  I know this because long ago, I worked for Seagate at their Longmont, CO location and know hard drives quite well.

I am sorry about this post but your writing rubbed me the wrong way.  Not everyone is out for gaming and less than 10% of systems out there are sold to gamers.  Most people buy a system to put on their desktop for common desktop applications and do not care for gaming.  Hell, most people don't know how to install a hard drive (much less RAM) or how to install an operating system in the first place. 

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Windows 10 can easily be downloaded from MS and put on a bootable thumb. Just activate the windows before you pull the hard drive and that computer will be registered and will reactivate easily when you put in the SSD. No installation media is ever needed again and I would advise a clean install and changing the bios to ACHI, cloning the drive may lead to more issues.

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flyboynm said:   
canoeguy1 said:     The PSU is where these companies always go as cheap as possible, since it's a spec that most people don't think to ask about.
180W is about as weak of a PSU as I've ever seen. This machine can't support any decent graphics card, so no running high-powered games on this rig.
My guess is that the case is too small for a dedicated graphics card anyway.

Any home user buying this should ask themselves: What specific app do I need an i7 for? 

You can get a used i5 system with identical specs for approx $100-$150 on eBay. Surfing the net will not be one bit slower, and you will save at least $300. Put some of that towards an SSD, and you will have a computer that's FAR faster than this system, yet costs half as much.

  Yes, companies always go as cheap as possible with PSU and it is a spec that most people do not think about but then again, 99% of people don't care about gaming that requires an add on card.  The 180W power supply is far from the weakest I have ever seen; I have seen a lot of 90 and 130 watt power supplies in my over 25+ of doing IT support.  Packard Bell, Acer  , HPDell and many others have systems that use these small PSU.  There are MANY things that an i7 can help for that a small business or home user use their systems for such as spreadsheets (some get that large), databases (again, some can get large enough to need it), MS Word documents (some people write books at home or it is their profession) and some like to play around with graphics.  In fact, according to Gardner, all of these things are more common uses for a computer than high-end gaming which require more powerful graphics. 

You are right with the price on eBay for an i5 on eBay, that surfing the Internet won't be slower (because that is based upon your ISP and not your computer) and the savings.  As for the SSD, it really depends upon WHAT SSD and its capacity.  There actually are SSDs out there that are slower than the hybrid SSD/platter drives.  I know this because long ago, I worked for Seagate at their Longmont, CO location and know hard drives quite well.

I am sorry about this post but your writing rubbed me the wrong way.  Not everyone is out for gaming and less than 10% of systems out there are sold to gamers.  Most people buy a system to put on their desktop for common desktop applications and do not care for gaming.  Hell, most people don't know how to install a hard drive (much less RAM) or how to install an operating system in the first place. 

  The key point is HOME USE. As I said, an i7 is good for (some limited) business use, but that's not who's buying these machines here.

How many home users need enormous spreadsheets, or databases? Do you believe those are "common desktop applications" for home users?

You can't intensively "play around with graphics" on this machine since it doesn't support a decent graphics card. You can only use the basic graphics built into the CPU. Any app that uses such basic graphics can't make use of the added capabilities of an i7 to any measurable extent. They've put a Ferrari engine in a lawnmower here.

I really doubt hyperthreading will help any if you're writing a book! Your typing speed is a lot slower than any CPU, and editing is also done at the speed of typing. A 10-year old dual-core PC can scroll through text just as fast as a new i7.

Remember, an i5 still has multithreading (4 cores), just not hyperthreading.

BTW: Your comparison of SSD's and hybrids is totally irrelevent to the topic. Modern SSD's are all MUCH faster than HDD's, which is what we're comparing to. The computer comes with an HDD, not a hybrid!

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I am not going to argue the point with you but you need to look at the following: 1 - Staples sells to a lot of small businesses and not just the home user.

According to Gardner (a leading IT reporting company), it is more likely that a user will use spreadsheets and databases than they are used for high end gaming. This is a trend according to many other reports too. It has been going on since the mid 2000s. As for "playing around with graphics" is concerned, Photoshop Elements and other "courtesy" applications that come with digital cameras were what I was referring. Those require a lot more processing power than video card GPU power.

When you are writing a book, it is very possible to need cpu power to help. Depends on the length of book and the GRAPHICS embedded into the book itself. I recently helped a customer whom was writing a textbook that was 500 pages long with numerous graphics. Guess what? Video card does NOTHING to help with that scenario. It is all CPU and RAM.

The SSD comment is that not all of them are faster and often the performance is not as good as a hybrid hard drive. StorageReview has numerous testing results that show this is the case. Adata is notorious for their poor performance drives. They have improved with the latest models but the old ones are still out there and being sold.  You have to be careful saying SSDs are going to ALWAYS be a better performer because that is not always the case.

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You can argue all you want! This is still a great deal for $479. Y'all are really getting way too deep into this. It's a cheap PC...

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justanothergeek said:   How about instead of debating our subjective opinions, we focus on the potential pros and cons and let Peeps draw their own conclusions? 

That's how I make my decision; by reading the back and forth.
 

  

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MrClean09 said:   You can argue all you want! This is still a great deal for $479. Y'all are really getting way too deep into this. It's a cheap PC...

Yup, i7s never go this low. Unless someone can point to something for an average home user at this price point, which I don't have to "build", I am going to bite.
 

  

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Bad link????

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devinanm said:   Bad link????
  Try clicking it twice

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rickster9 said:   
MrClean09 said:   You can argue all you want! This is still a great deal for $479. Y'all are really getting way too deep into this. It's a cheap PC...

Yup, i7s never go this low. Unless someone can point to something for an average home user at this price point, which I don't have to "build", I am going to bite.

  

  How about this?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/HP-Compaq-8200-Elite-CMT-PC-Intel-Core-i... 

That saves you $300, yet is still an i7 (albeit 2nd gen instead of 6th gen).
There are many more like it.

I don;t understand the need to spend $500 on an i7 PC to surf the net, unless you really like throwing money down the drain. TIme have changed. PC's are dirt cheap now. Even i7's.
 

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Thanks for the link.

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MrClean09 said:   You can argue all you want! This is still a great deal for $479. Y'all are really getting way too deep into this. It's a cheap PC...
 Thank you.  It was $445 over the weekend, and now they bumped it to $499.

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