rated:
Works great - filters are strong enough to handle constant airflow without bending under pressure for months at a time.

rated:
Excellent deal, and they're actually in stock for online ordering. Bought a bunch of them.

rated:
I bought these 2 years ago when they were on sale (link to old sale)

However, I won't be buying them again. They require replacement much more often than the Filtrete ones I used previously. I think a lot of that is because they only have a few pleats per foot. Eg, they use less than half the filtering material than other filters I've used. So of course they're going to be cheaper. It's the equivalent of a bar of soap that's been hollowed out underneath and they claim they're a much better price than brand x!

I just bought a bunch of filters yesterday with all the 'zom promos going on. As an example (out of hundreds potentially), here's some 18"x25" MERV 10 filters (not an arbitrary "FPR" number) for $1.46 per filter before any other discounts.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B006NWOEZ6/

rated:
16X25X1 

Here is the link to 16x25x1, same price.  Great find!!
 

rated:
Thanks! I bought a year's worth

rated:
Dotbody said:   I bought these 2 years ago when they were on sale (link to old sale )

However, I won't be buying them again. They require replacement much more often than the Filtrete ones I used previously. I think a lot of that is because they only have a few pleats per foot. Eg, they use less than half the filtering material than other filters I've used. So of course they're going to be cheaper. It's the equivalent of a bar of soap that's been hollowed out underneath and they claim they're a much better price than brand x!

I just bought a bunch of filters yesterday with all the 'zom promos going on. As an example (out of hundreds potentially), here's some 18"x25" MERV 10 filters (not an arbitrary "FPR" number) for $1.46 per filter before any other discounts.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B006NWOEZ6/

  I am reading some reviews where they are complaining of these filters you mention being somewhat smaller than the actual size listed. Have you noticed this?

rated:
wolfsmane said:   
Dotbody said:   I bought these 2 years ago when they were on sale (link to old sale )

However, I won't be buying them again. They require replacement much more often than the Filtrete ones I used previously. I think a lot of that is because they only have a few pleats per foot. Eg, they use less than half the filtering material than other filters I've used. So of course they're going to be cheaper. It's the equivalent of a bar of soap that's been hollowed out underneath and they claim they're a much better price than brand x!

I just bought a bunch of filters yesterday with all the 'zom promos going on. As an example (out of hundreds potentially), here's some 18"x25" MERV 10 filters (not an arbitrary "FPR" number) for $1.46 per filter before any other discounts.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B006NWOEZ6/

  I am reading some reviews where they are complaining of these filters you mention being somewhat smaller than the actual size listed. Have you noticed this?

I'm not sure; I'll find out once they arrive. I actually bought the 2" depth ones, as my intake can accommodate several sizes... it's a "slant" style where the filter rests at a slant in the air return duct. So I'm only picky about the filter width, not the length.

I will say these Honeywell's are not exact dimensions either. The 25x25 I got previously measure 24.6" x 24.7"

rated:
Dotbody said:   I bought these 2 years ago when they were on sale (link to old sale )

However, I won't be buying them again. They require replacement much more often than the Filtrete ones I used previously. I think a lot of that is because they only have a few pleats per foot. Eg, they use less than half the filtering material than other filters I've used. So of course they're going to be cheaper. It's the equivalent of a bar of soap that's been hollowed out underneath and they claim they're a much better price than brand x!

I just bought a bunch of filters yesterday with all the 'zom promos going on. As an example (out of hundreds potentially), here's some 18"x25" MERV 10 filters (not an arbitrary "FPR" number) for $1.46 per filter before any other discounts.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B006NWOEZ6/ 

  These are listed as used for the price you quoted and the comments said they arrived with every filter damaged. 

rated:
+1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.

rated:
jasonv1 said:   +1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.

But, does it really?  If there's no air coming, why would the fan be beleaguered?  If you spin a fan in vacuum, does it work harder?  
Seems like filter scare tactics.  Not that I think a dirty filter is OK, because all what'll be going on is air being recycled and air coming down the up spout - certainly less desirable - but does it really stress the fan?  
 

rated:
Yes absolutely. Dirty filters are the #1 cause of premature HVAC burn out by far.

rated:
jasonv1 said:   +1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.
  Never thought of that, but it does make sense - the higher the MERV the sooner it gets clogged.
 

rated:
I buy a dozen BLUE filters at Menard's every year,
tear open end of box at perforation
set on top of "garage fridge"
Take sharpy and label each filter's exposed end cardboard with "JAN", "FEB", et al.
replace furnace filter at first of each month

REPEAT YEARLY...

rated:
TowHead said:   
jasonv1 said:   +1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.

But, does it really?  If there's no air coming, why would the fan be beleaguered?  If you spin a fan in vacuum, does it work harder?  
Seems like filter scare tactics.  Not that I think a dirty filter is OK, because all what'll be going on is air being recycled and air coming down the up spout - certainly less desirable - but does it really stress the fan?  

 Take a box fan, put a towel over the air inlet "side", and listen to the change in sound. A box fan isn't a closed system but it is obvious it is under more stress when you do that.

Plus your A/C *may* cycle more since it is getting less inlet air, buildup of junk in the ducts since airflow is lessened, etc, etc etc. If you don't have a lot of dust in your house you can buy lower rated filters that pull less stuff out of the air and therefore need less changing, but I have the second most "powerful" filters and in my case after 6 weeks the downstair filter looks like it has a blanket on it. And this is with a Dyson vacuum that is pulling tons of stuff out of the carpet as well. Honestly sometimes I wonder why everyone in the house hasn't faded away based on how much crap that filter and our vacuum pull out of the air/floors.
 

rated:
jasonv1 said:   
TowHead said:   
jasonv1 said:   +1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.

But, does it really?  If there's no air coming, why would the fan be beleaguered?  If you spin a fan in vacuum, does it work harder?  
Seems like filter scare tactics.  Not that I think a dirty filter is OK, because all what'll be going on is air being recycled and air coming down the up spout - certainly less desirable - but does it really stress the fan?  

 Take a box fan, put a towel over the air inlet "side", and listen to the change in sound. A box fan isn't a closed system but it is obvious it is under more stress when you do that.

Plus your A/C *may* cycle more since it is getting less inlet air, buildup of junk in the ducts since airflow is lessened, etc, etc etc. If you don't have a lot of dust in your house you can buy lower rated filters that pull less stuff out of the air and therefore need less changing, but I have the second most "powerful" filters and in my case after 6 weeks the downstair filter looks like it has a blanket on it. And this is with a Dyson vacuum that is pulling tons of stuff out of the carpet as well. Honestly sometimes I wonder why everyone in the house hasn't faded away based on how much crap that filter and our vacuum pull out of the air/floors.


  I'm not sure it's as clearcut as that. It depends whether your air intakes are sized large enough to handle the filters. If you have a large surface area on the intakes, you can use higher MERV filters without causing too much of a drop in static pressure.

For example, you need approx 400 cfm/ton for A/C on the return side, as a minimum.
A rule of thumb seems to be: 2 CFM per sq in of filter grille.
So, a 4-ton HVAC unit needs 1600 cfm/2 = 800 sq in of return filter grille.

If you have 1200 sq in available, you can probably go with quite a high MERV rating (or allow your filters to get quite dirty) without affecting performance too much. If you only have 800 sq in, you're living on the edge and probably need to go with low MERV filters.

Our 4-ton HVAC unit has 1000 sq in available (20x20 and 20x30 grilles), and seems to run fine on MERV 11. We change the filters 2-3 times a year.

rated:
canoeguy1 said:   
jasonv1 said:   
TowHead said:   
jasonv1 said:   +1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.

But, does it really?  If there's no air coming, why would the fan be beleaguered?  If you spin a fan in vacuum, does it work harder?  
Seems like filter scare tactics.  Not that I think a dirty filter is OK, because all what'll be going on is air being recycled and air coming down the up spout - certainly less desirable - but does it really stress the fan?  

 Take a box fan, put a towel over the air inlet "side", and listen to the change in sound. A box fan isn't a closed system but it is obvious it is under more stress when you do that.

Plus your A/C *may* cycle more since it is getting less inlet air, buildup of junk in the ducts since airflow is lessened, etc, etc etc. If you don't have a lot of dust in your house you can buy lower rated filters that pull less stuff out of the air and therefore need less changing, but I have the second most "powerful" filters and in my case after 6 weeks the downstair filter looks like it has a blanket on it. And this is with a Dyson vacuum that is pulling tons of stuff out of the carpet as well. Honestly sometimes I wonder why everyone in the house hasn't faded away based on how much crap that filter and our vacuum pull out of the air/floors.


  I'm not sure it's as clearcut as that. It depends whether your air intakes are sized large enough to handle the filters. If you have a large surface area on the intakes, you can use higher MERV filters without causing too much of a drop in static pressure.

For example, you need approx 400 cfm/ton for A/C on the return side, as a minimum.
A rule of thumb seems to be: 2 CFM per sq in of filter grille.
So, a 4-ton HVAC unit needs 1600 cfm/2 = 800 sq in of return filter grille.

If you have 1200 sq in available, you can probably go with quite a high MERV rating (or allow your filters to get quite dirty) without affecting performance too much. If you only have 800 sq in, you're living on the edge and probably need to go with low MERV filters.

Our 4-ton HVAC unit has 1000 sq in available (20x20 and 20x30 grilles), and seems to run fine on MERV 11. We change the filters 2-3 times a year.

  In theory, your logic is correct but in practice, the filter holder is sized correctly for your installation so every increased in MERV will put extra stress on the fan. 

rated:
hvn4179 said:   
canoeguy1 said:   
jasonv1 said:   
TowHead said:   
jasonv1 said:   +1 for the Nordic Pure filters. I personally had no issues with them being damaged in transit, and the filters work really well. Just remember that if you get ones with the higher MERV rating you need to be on top of changing them as if they get too dirty it puts extra stress on your blower fan.

But, does it really?  If there's no air coming, why would the fan be beleaguered?  If you spin a fan in vacuum, does it work harder?  
Seems like filter scare tactics.  Not that I think a dirty filter is OK, because all what'll be going on is air being recycled and air coming down the up spout - certainly less desirable - but does it really stress the fan?  

 Take a box fan, put a towel over the air inlet "side", and listen to the change in sound. A box fan isn't a closed system but it is obvious it is under more stress when you do that.

Plus your A/C *may* cycle more since it is getting less inlet air, buildup of junk in the ducts since airflow is lessened, etc, etc etc. If you don't have a lot of dust in your house you can buy lower rated filters that pull less stuff out of the air and therefore need less changing, but I have the second most "powerful" filters and in my case after 6 weeks the downstair filter looks like it has a blanket on it. And this is with a Dyson vacuum that is pulling tons of stuff out of the carpet as well. Honestly sometimes I wonder why everyone in the house hasn't faded away based on how much crap that filter and our vacuum pull out of the air/floors.


  I'm not sure it's as clearcut as that. It depends whether your air intakes are sized large enough to handle the filters. If you have a large surface area on the intakes, you can use higher MERV filters without causing too much of a drop in static pressure.

For example, you need approx 400 cfm/ton for A/C on the return side, as a minimum.
A rule of thumb seems to be: 2 CFM per sq in of filter grille.
So, a 4-ton HVAC unit needs 1600 cfm/2 = 800 sq in of return filter grille.

If you have 1200 sq in available, you can probably go with quite a high MERV rating (or allow your filters to get quite dirty) without affecting performance too much. If you only have 800 sq in, you're living on the edge and probably need to go with low MERV filters.

Our 4-ton HVAC unit has 1000 sq in available (20x20 and 20x30 grilles), and seems to run fine on MERV 11. We change the filters 2-3 times a year.

  In theory, your logic is correct but in practice, the filter holder is sized correctly for your installation so every increased in MERV will put extra stress on the fan. 

  Fans are designed to handle a certain static pressure, so the fan will not be under stress if the specs are adhered to.
 

rated:
Link doesn't work anymore.. Dead I think

rated:
didn't work for me.

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