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posted 10 days ago by
jpessin3
Senior Member

Staples has the TI-84 Graphing Calculator CE (stands for Color Edition) for $89.99 (no rebate involved) starting Sunday 7/16 . Calculator comes in a few different colors including pink and blue. This matches the lowest price from last summer.

Note that purchasing the calculator in store will earn you Staples rewards, while buying online will not get you rewards but can earn you 2% - 5% back using cashback portals (ebates currently is 2%). Buying online will also help you avoid the hard sell in store to get you to buy the SquareTrade Warranty.

I am not sure if you can apply any coupons to this purchase (like the $25 off $75) since this has a $60 instant savings and usually these coupons can only be used on regular priced items. 

UPDATE on 7/16/17:  Staples now has $25 off $100 using visa checkout. So buy this calculator and a $10 filler and using retailmenot (see johnrolfe post below) you can get the calculator and a $10 filler for $60. Please note when you set up your retailmenot account, make sure to use the email address for your paypal count.

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More deals in the official Staples clearance thread.
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Appears that RetailMeNot.com is offering a $15 off $75 purchase @ Staples thru 7/31. Says you can stack it with other deals. $15 rebate is cash back to PayPal.

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There are free software based alternatives to this.not saying it will replace today but the cost of these Graphing calculator is very high compared to what you get for same money for smartphones
https://www.desmos.com/

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luvGnuLinux said:   There are free software based alternatives to this.not saying it will replace today but the cost of these Graphing calculator is very high compared to what you get for same money for smartphones
https://www.desmos.com/

  I'm going to guess that most (maybe all) people who need this particular calculator need it for high school, as well as ACT/SAT exams, where that isn't an option. Something like that may be best suited for somebody who is a college student who no longer has or never had an actual TI-84, as often times, you aren't allowed to use graphing calculators (or sometimes any calculators) on tests in college anyway.

As an aside, while this is a good price for it compared to the usual price, I'm amazed that this calculator still costs this much. I mean, sure, it has color and everything now (mostly a gimmick), but fundamentally it's not all that much different from the TI-83 that was released 20 years ago (or even the TI-82 that was released in 1993). I guess that's how things work when things become so standardized that this is the calculator of record, and now today's high school math teachers are coming from a generation that used these themselves as high school students, so I imagine they won't be going anywhere anytime soon.

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Personally, I believe these calculators are absolutely not worth their money; however, they are REQUIRED in every high school math class in US public schools. Texas Instruments threw tons of money at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics around 15 years ago and got them to say that it is impossible to learn math without owning one of these. So now every kid in high school has to own one of these; it guarantees that most kids don't learn basic math anymore but what does TI care - they make billions of dollars on these!

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jpessin3 said:   Personally, I believe these calculators are absolutely not worth their money; however, they are REQUIRED in every high school math class in US public schools. Texas Instruments threw tons of money at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics around 15 years ago and got them to say that it is impossible to learn math without owning one of these. So now every kid in high school has to own one of these; it guarantees that most kids don't learn basic math anymore but what does TI care - they make billions of dollars on these!
  I've taught math, at the college level and soon will be at the high school level. It's absolutely amazing at how different the attitude toward these calculators is between those two levels. In college, they are strongly discouraged and often not permitted (that's not to mention that a complete calculator ban is common for courses like precalculus and calculus), but in high schools, they're a thing that teachers insist every student must have, no matter what. And given how curriculum guidelines ingrain those calculator guidelines into what must be taught and what will be on the standardized tests (example: things like "students should be able to _____ using a graphing utility"), it's pretty much impossible to take a personal stand to say "no" on using them.

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sdskees said:   
jpessin3 said:   Personally, I believe these calculators are absolutely not worth their money; however, they are REQUIRED in every high school math class in US public schools. Texas Instruments threw tons of money at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics around 15 years ago and got them to say that it is impossible to learn math without owning one of these. So now every kid in high school has to own one of these; it guarantees that most kids don't learn basic math anymore but what does TI care - they make billions of dollars on these!
  I've taught math, at the college level and soon will be at the high school level. It's absolutely amazing at how different the attitude toward these calculators is between those two levels. In college, they are strongly discouraged and often not permitted (that's not to mention that a complete calculator ban is common for courses like precalculus and calculus), but in high schools, they're a thing that teachers insist every student must have, no matter what. And given how curriculum guidelines ingrain those calculator guidelines into what must be taught and what will be on the standardized tests (example: things like "students should be able to _____ using a graphing utility"), it's pretty much impossible to take a personal stand to say "no" on using them.

  These calculators are far better than requiring them to do it all by hand. Sure, make sure they can do it by hand and fully understand the concepts but not by hand all the time. That would be a tremendous waste of time. The math programs have been around for a while and I preferred mathematica back when I was in college. Concept-wise, math classes in my day always moved slowly since the focus was always on doing it by hand. Cut out the busy work with tools and keep pressing forward to learn faster. I used power tools to build my deck and chose not to use a screwdriver for the same reason. It was to save time and make more progress. TI products protect against cheating which smartphones do not(that is the only appeal to me).

Great deal if you are in the market for one though!

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Sorry... starting 7/16

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Speaking as somebody who was not allowed to use even a scientific calculator in HS let alone a graphing calculator for Calculus; I can see the advantage of having one. It saves time. You can change the parameters and in seconds you can see how the graph behaves. Some people learn visually, they learn by examples. For me, it makes a big difference when I see how things change as I introduce more complexities. For my HS kid these calculators are mandatory. Yes, I know it is pricey, I know you can have a smartphone app to mimic exactly what these overpriced calculators are doing but smartphones are not allowed during college board exams.

Come to think of it, if I take into account how many years one will be using it, per year cost is negligible.  
Thanks for sharing this deal. 

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johnrolfe said:   Appears that RetailMeNot.com is offering a $15 off $75 purchase @ Staples thru 7/31. Says you can stack it with other deals. $15 rebate is cash back to PayPal.

Couldn't find the Retailmenot link for this coupon. Could you please post the link? Thanks
 

  

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Just about every kid in HS has a smartphone now. There are lots of free APPs can be sued for scientific calculating. When I asked my kids (8th and 9th graders) if they need a calculator, they were laughing at me.
I think there calculators are getting obsolete soon.

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StapledPants said:   Speaking as somebody who was not allowed to use even a scientific calculator in HS let alone a graphing calculator for Calculus; I can see the advantage of having one. It saves time. You can change the parameters and in seconds you can see how the graph behaves. Some people learn visually, they learn by examples. For me, it makes a big difference when I see how things change as I introduce more complexities. For my HS kid these calculators are mandatory. Yes, I know it is pricey, I know you can have a smartphone app to mimic exactly what these overpriced calculators are doing but smartphones are not allowed during college board exams.

Come to think of it, if I take into account how many years one will be using it, per year cost is negligible.  
Thanks for sharing this deal. 

  The problem is that once they start using the calculator they stop doing math by hand and lose their arithmetic skills, which probably is the most important math they will need in real life. That is why all of a sudden they get to the college level and they are not allowed to use these graphing calculators any more.

But the argument over whether they are useful or not is irrelevant; they are required for high school kids which is why you need to get them. They are not going to go away as TI as a company makes around $500 billion a year on them and they have lobbyists who get paid millions of dollars who will swear that the world will come to an end worse than a nuclear war if we tried to get rid of them.

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ahlex said:   Just about every kid in HS has a smartphone now. There are lots of free APPs can be sued for scientific calculating. When I asked my kids (8th and 9th graders) if they need a calculator, they were laughing at me.
I think there calculators are getting obsolete soon.

  
You can not use a cell phone on a test (at least not in the classes of teachers who don't want everyone cheating)

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jpessin3 said:   
StapledPants said:   Speaking as somebody who was not allowed to use even a scientific calculator in HS let alone a graphing calculator for Calculus; I can see the advantage of having one. It saves time. You can change the parameters and in seconds you can see how the graph behaves. Some people learn visually, they learn by examples. For me, it makes a big difference when I see how things change as I introduce more complexities. For my HS kid these calculators are mandatory. Yes, I know it is pricey, I know you can have a smartphone app to mimic exactly what these overpriced calculators are doing but smartphones are not allowed during college board exams.

Come to think of it, if I take into account how many years one will be using it, per year cost is negligible.  
Thanks for sharing this deal. 

  The problem is that once they start using the calculator they stop doing math by hand and lose their arithmetic skills, which probably is the most important math they will need in real life. That is why all of a sudden they get to the college level and they are not allowed to use these graphing calculators any more.

But the argument over whether they are useful or not is irrelevant; they are required for high school kids which is why you need to get them. They are not going to go away as TI as a company makes around $500 billion a year on them and they have lobbyists who get paid millions of dollars who will swear that the world will come to an end worse than a nuclear war if we tried to get rid of them.

  
Why in a pro-con discussion the "pro" side is irrelevant? If a graphing calculator helps students to learn faster and absorb the material better, why not let them use it? 

No argument with the usefulness of arithmetic skills in life. Introducing calculators in elementary school  instead of making the kids memorize number tables and practice mental calculation is not helping the situation.  

Desmos has online graphing calculator for $0. The acceptance of online tools in education is growing. The SAT and ACT, the two standardized tests that the majority of American high-school students take for their college applications, are both considering going digital in the next few years. If online testing becomes the norm, it stands to reason that so will online calculators will eventually be made available during those tests and the clunky graphing calculators will bite the dust.

"TI as a company makes around $500 billion a year on them and they have lobbyists who get paid millions of dollars who will swear that the world will come to an end worse than a nuclear war if we tried to get rid of them."         That's hyperbole, right? TI made $13 billion in 2016.
 

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It's 12 am and i dont see it on sale. when will it be on sale?

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UPDATE on 7/16/17: Staples now has $25 off $100 using visa checkout. So buy this calculator and a $10 filler and using retailmenot (see johnrolfe post) you can get the calculator and a $10 filler for $60. Please note when you set up your retailmenot account, make sure to use the email address for your paypal count.

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