ChargePoint Home Electric Vehicle Charger Wi-Fi Enabled 25 ft. Cord 32 Amp Hardwired Station Indoor/Outdoor Install - $599.00 @ Home Depot. Shipping is free.


  • Charges all EVs up to 6X faster than a standard wall outlet
  • Track charging activity and schedule charging with the mobile app
  • ENERGY STAR, UL listed for electrical safety, 3-year warranty



 

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typical installation cost? Work w/ Tesla?

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needhelpplease said:   typical installation cost? Work w/ Tesla?
  1) $200 - 400
2) If you have a Tesla, you don't need this, Tesla's charger is better

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The Tesla version can go up to 80amps. There is no reason to buy this for the same price when the Tesla version is better. Other vehicles... Why not?

This one is compatible with Tesla if you have the adapter though.

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Will be getting a model 3 early next year (Hoping ) I have a dryer plug close to the garage or I could use a 110 plug overnight right?

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needhelpplease said:   Will be getting a model 3 early next year (Hoping ) I have a dryer plug close to the garage or I could use a 110 plug overnight right?
  Yes and Yes

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You really should convert the 110 outlet to a 220.  110 charging on an EV is reportedly pretty slow.  If you have a nearby 220 for the dryer, theres a chance the wiring to support it is already in place.  If not, they'll have to run wiring from your panel.  Its worth the cost IMO.

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Based on my experience with a Chevy Volt, it takes at least ten hours to fully charge it from empty on 110V, and four hours on 220V. The nightly period with lowest electricity rate last only 8 hours. So this may be worth the investment to take full advantage of the night rate.

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220 v is a must.

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220 is your only real option. 110 would take days to charge from empty on a Tesla. Even topping off would become a challenge. I've used 110 twice and it was enough to convince me to buy the Tesla charger and install the 100 amp circuit.

Note: mine has dual chargers so it can take advantage of the 80 amp Max. If yours does not you will get a 50 amp circuit running 40 amps continuously.

Sorry if I'm threadjacking...

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How long to charge e.v

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Generally speaking, does installing a charger require a building permit? Seems like just about everything from HD that is not plug-in does anymore ...

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jschuman said:   Generally speaking, does installing a charger require a building permit? Seems like just about everything from HD that is not plug-in does anymore ...
Generally speaking, yes, if it is hard wired, your jurisdiction is likely to require a permit, especially if you are running a new circuit to it.

rated:
My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

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jschuman said:   Generally speaking, does installing a charger require a building permit? Seems like just about everything from HD that is not plug-in does anymore ...
  Depends on the complexity and the jusidiction.

Adding a new panel, oh yeah that needs a permit.

Adding a plug, not really. (But that's my local jurisdiction)
 

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peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Using this method, how long will it take to charge Model 3 or S? Also, would appreciate if you can elaborate attaching charger's pigtail to a NEMA 6-50 plug.  Thanks

rated:
Don't buy this for a Tesla. As mentioned elsewhere Tesla's charger is better for their cars. And you get one with your car.

If you have a Tesla already buy their wall connector instead if you for some reason don't want to use the EVSE you got with your car.

If you don't have a Tesla yet don't buy any EVSE (charger) at all. One comes with the car.

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Why does 110 take more than 2x as long as 220?

Because part of the available juice from either is used to run internal battery cooling. It's a parasitic loss which is going on the entire charge. And 110 takes such a long time...

It really kills the charge rate, AND it just wastes a considerable proportion of electricity.

Gotta have 220, unless you're mooching a partial charge at a friend or relatives house.

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lexcurat said:   Why does 110 take more than 2x as long as 220?

Because part of the available juice from either is used to run internal battery cooling. It's a parasitic loss which is going on the entire charge. And 110 takes such a long time...

It really kills the charge rate, AND it just wastes a considerable proportion of electricity.

Gotta have 220, unless you're mooching a partial charge at a friend or relatives house.

  Because 220 in this case is 32A. 32A*220V is 6600W. 110 is 12A (no, not 15 in his case) 110V*12A is 1320W. 6600 is about 5x 1320.

That's why 220V is more than twice as fast as 110V.

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docjoo said:   
peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Using this method, how long will it take to charge Model 3 or S? Also, would appreciate if you can elaborate attaching charger's pigtail to a NEMA 6-50 plug.  Thanks


Since a NEMA 6-50 outlet supports up to 50A, the charge time will be the same as any high power home EV charging circuit.  Charge time depends on battery capacity and battery level, but probably around 4-6 hours for a depleted Model 3 pack.

Another plug option is NEMA 14-50 which is commonly used in RV campgrounds.  The advantage using this is that you can take your EVSE 'charger' with you on longer trips and charge at most RV places.

FYI - Tesla includes the NEAM 14-50 adapter for their EVSE.

rated:
peas said:   
docjoo said:   
peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Using this method, how long will it take to charge Model 3 or S? Also, would appreciate if you can elaborate attaching charger's pigtail to a NEMA 6-50 plug.  Thanks


Since a NEMA 6-50 outlet supports up to 50A, the charge time will be the same as any high power home EV charging circuit.  Charge time depends on battery capacity and battery level, but probably around 4-6 hours for a depleted Model 3 pack.

Another plug option is NEMA 14-50 which is commonly used in RV campgrounds.  The advantage using this is that you can take your EVSE 'charger' with you on longer trips and charge at most RV places.

FYI - Tesla includes the NEAM 14-50 adapter for their EVSE.

  Thanks for sharing useful information. Will NEAM 14-50 plug option also allow depleted Model 3 to be fully charged in 4 to 6 hours? If that's the case, What's the advantage of installing Tesla Wall Connector?

rated:
docjoo said:   
peas said:   
docjoo said:   
peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Using this method, how long will it take to charge Model 3 or S? Also, would appreciate if you can elaborate attaching charger's pigtail to a NEMA 6-50 plug.  Thanks


Since a NEMA 6-50 outlet supports up to 50A, the charge time will be the same as any high power home EV charging circuit.  Charge time depends on battery capacity and battery level, but probably around 4-6 hours for a depleted Model 3 pack.

Another plug option is NEMA 14-50 which is commonly used in RV campgrounds.  The advantage using this is that you can take your EVSE 'charger' with you on longer trips and charge at most RV places.

FYI - Tesla includes the NEAM 14-50 adapter for their EVSE.

  Thanks for sharing useful information. Will NEAM 14-50 plug option also allow depleted Model 3 to be fully charged in 4 to 6 hours? If that's the case, What's the advantage of installing Tesla Wall Connector?

  
A 14-50 plug will support a 40 amp charger as you are required to have some extra head room for continuous loads like a EV charger. The Tesla chargers are a 60 or 90 amp circuit so probably ~50 amp or ~75 amp charging rate either of which is going to charge you a bit faster than the 40 amp you'd get on a NEAM 14-50 plug. The 90amp charger does require an optional upgrade in the EV to beef up the charging capabilities in the car. Basically adding a second AC to DC converter to handle the higher current.

rated:
docjoo said:   
peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Using this method, how long will it take to charge Model 3 or S? Also, would appreciate if you can elaborate attaching charger's pigtail to a NEMA 6-50 plug.  Thanks

Tesla specifies a 14-50 NEMA plug. It's an RV hook-up plug. The cars come with a nice portable charger people use daily. The older models charge at 40amp. The newer models charge at 48 amps.
You need 2 slots on your electrical panel and 50 amps of capacity.
The cost of install depends on how long the run is. The Tesla recommended electricians tend to charge a "Tesla tax" of around $1,200 to $1,500 without even looking at your home, and that's assuming  your panel is ok and close by. If you have a decent electrician, they can do it. There are instructions on the Tesla site that my guy used. Most electricians change anywhere from $600- $800 in SoCal for an straight forward install.

Tesla does offer an 80amp wall charger that will reqiure 100amps from your panel, which usually means you need a second panel.

Don't even think about using a 110 outlet, even a 20amp one will take a day.
.
 

rated:
docjoo said:   
peas said:   
docjoo said:   
peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Using this method, how long will it take to charge Model 3 or S? Also, would appreciate if you can elaborate attaching charger's pigtail to a NEMA 6-50 plug.  Thanks


Since a NEMA 6-50 outlet supports up to 50A, the charge time will be the same as any high power home EV charging circuit.  Charge time depends on battery capacity and battery level, but probably around 4-6 hours for a depleted Model 3 pack.

Another plug option is NEMA 14-50 which is commonly used in RV campgrounds.  The advantage using this is that you can take your EVSE 'charger' with you on longer trips and charge at most RV places.

FYI - Tesla includes the NEAM 14-50 adapter for their EVSE.

  Thanks for sharing useful information. Will NEAM 14-50 plug option also allow depleted Model 3 to be fully charged in 4 to 6 hours? If that's the case, What's the advantage of installing Tesla Wall Connector?

  It depends on which Model 3 you mean. The base unit only charges at 32A. There would be no advantage to installing the Tesla Wall Connector. The upgraded range model charges at up to 48A, it would go 20% faster on a Tesla Wall Connector than the Tesla portable EVSE that comes with it. That is, if you put it on a 60A or greater circuit. You are not required to do so.

In practice, you'll rarely if ever need the faster charging. Only if you come in from a long trip (depleted battery) and need to go on a long trip (full range) very quickly after and can't charge on the way at a Supercharger will it make any difference. And again, then only on the longer-range 3.

A Model 3 would take about 7 hours to charge from empty if you charge it at its full rate (in your home). Since the smaller battery one also charges slower it ends up being the same number for either one. If you used the longer-range 3 on the included 40A charger it would take about 8 hours.

Again, if you don't have a Tesla yet, don't buy an EVSE (charger) right now. Don't even consider one. Not this one. Not any of them. Get the car first and then see how you use it. It's very easy to spend a lot of money uselessly overdoing it. Just plan to get a NEMA 14-50 or 6-50 installed in your garage (as appropriate, if you are getting a Tesla you want the 14-50) and use the EVSE that comes with it. If you really feel like being careful then get the 14-50/6-50 installed using wiring capable of 60A and then if you find you need the Tesla Wall Connector you can just buy it and install it cheaply running at 48A (you will need to hardware it and install a 60A breaker though, when the 14-50 is put there it will be with a receptacle and 50A breaker).

rated:
peas said:   My seasoned advice:
Have an electrician install a NEMA 6-50 outlet which is relatively inexpensive.  Attach the charger's pigtail (open ended wiring) to a NEMA 6-50 plug and just plug it in.  This will allow you to easily move the charger to another house later.  Another benefit is you can plug in different chargers such as a Tesla charge cord.  Hard-wiring is much more limiting and only saves a few $.

  Comes with a 6-50 plug for $50 more at Home Despot

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