This deal is in one of those Radio Shack clearence threads when the price was $50 each, but that was from two months ago. The price has now been lowered to $20 each. You need to buy both the Accurian Digital Audio send and the Accurian Audio Receiver, so really the deal is $40.

Powerline Digital Audio Sender
RS catalog #15-1938
Original: $100
Clearance: $20

Sender


Powerline Amplified Receiver
RS catalog #15-1937
Original: $150
Clearance: $20

Amp

This system is a rebadged ST&T iMicro system:

ST&T

You can easily modify the Amplifer receiver to accept an analog input, instead of the powerline input. $20 for a 25x2 amp seems hot to me.

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Also they have a powered speaker that works with this system that would be just fine for extension and surround use.

Speakers

Only $30/pr and they only need the transmitter to complete the system.

In the fatwallet spirit, here's how you can modify the Accurian Amplified Receiver so you can use it just like a regular Amplifier. Normally, you can only get an audio signal from the powerline to the receiver. What you will be doing is unplugging the powerline input, and plugging in the "audio out" connection to where the powerline input originally went. Keep in mind that by doing this you can no longer receive audio signals from the powerline transmitter. This is really easy to do:

STEPS

1. Flip the Accurian Receiver over and remove the four rubber feet on the bottom.
2. Use a Philips screwdriver and remove the four screws located underneath the rubber feet, and also remove the fifth screw located on the underside as well (the fifth screw is uncovered).
3. Remove the top Accurian cover. The front part of the cover is held on by some sticky foam, so don't be afraid to pull hard.
4. Unplug both the powerline input and the "audio out" input. Both are circled here in yellow:

Step 4

5. Plug the "audio out" input into where the powerline input orginally was. This picture circles the "audio out" input and where to plug it in (it's the red/white/black connector and it connects to the outer most connection on the board) :

Step 5

6. Put the cover back on, put the screws back in (there are five), and put the rubber feet back on.

Done!

You can now use the "audio out" plug on the back as an audio input instead:

Audio In

Anyone have a review of this? I'd like to pick it up for rear speakers in an expensive surround 5.1 system. Is there interference? Good sound quality? Thanks...

mmarcuse said: Anyone have a review of this? I'd like to pick it up for rear speakers in an expensive surround 5.1 system. Is there interference? Good sound quality? Thanks...

The system sounds OK. HOWEVER, you are almost guaranteed to hear interference in the signal from other appliances in your house. The question is: Is the convenience of the system worth living with the continual interference? Not for me, but your mileage may vary.

Kwad

KwadGuy said: mmarcuse said: Anyone have a review of this? I'd like to pick it up for rear speakers in an expensive surround 5.1 system. Is there interference? Good sound quality? Thanks...

The system sounds OK. HOWEVER, you are almost guaranteed to hear interference in the signal from other appliances in your house. The question is: Is the convenience of the system worth living with the continual interference? Not for me, but your mileage may vary.

Kwad


Thanks for the info, I think I'll pass. My electrical wiring is awful in my apartment, so I'm going to let others grab the deal...

how to use this item exactly, I am still quite confused. What's the difference from a regualr amplifier? Can I use it as a headphone amp?

ddyourself said: how to use this item exactly, I am still quite confused. What's the difference from a regualr amplifier? Can I use it as a headphone amp?

No, you cannot use it as a headphone amplifier. You can modify it, as described above, and it will be a regular amplifier. Otherwise, you need to buy the audio sender to receive sound. The system works off your 115v wall power. It uses high frequency modulation to send data over your power line safely. This allows you send audio to different rooms without any additional wires. You simply plug the sender box into the wall, plug the amp into the wall, connect speakers, and listen.

tschanrm said:
No, you cannot use it as a headphone amplifier. You can modify it, as described above, and it will be a regular amplifier. Otherwise, you need to buy the audio sender to receive sound. The system works off your 115v wall power. It uses high frequency modulation to send data over your power line safely. This allows you send audio to different rooms without any additional wires. You simply plug the sender box into the wall, plug the amp into the wall, connect speakers, and listen.


After the amplifier hack, what power (ohms?) should the speakers I plug into it have? Just worried if it can damage the my speakers. Thanks for info.

Is this really a Digital Amplifier or just marketing thing? Use of Toroid transformer, indicate quality but still not sure is this Digital Amplifier or Analog Amplifier.

I will pass it as it's just 2 channel (Left & Right) transmitter, not 5.1. Here is the Manual

Fine use for $10 off $20 from closing Radio$hack stores!

mmarcuse said:
Thanks for the info, I think I'll pass. My electrical wiring is awful in my apartment, so I'm going to let others grab the deal...
I used to sell these at RadioShack. Do not buy these if you live in any sort of apartment or condo or townhouse. Interference will make them impractical to use.

PatelFromIndia said: Is this really a Digital Amplifier or just marketing thing? Use of Toroid transformer, indicate quality but still not sure is this Digital Amplifier or Analog Amplifier.

I will pass it as it's just 2 channel (Left & Right) transmitter, not 5.1. Here is the Manual


My guess is it's a standard class A/B analog amp. I believe the digital aspect deals with the transmission of the signal through power lines. However it's not a total success... there is still line noise.

Even in a standalone house, there are usually 2 110/120v input power lines, making most houses essentially have a "two-parts" powerline network. Interference or chance of out-of-sync increases if the transmitter and receiver are in the different parts of the "network" as the signal has to jump over to the other side at the main junction/fuse box.

This applies to x10 network, powerline ethernet network, and this sound transmitting network.

Hope this make sense in this very condensed explanation.



zephyrprime said: mmarcuse said:
Thanks for the info, I think I'll pass. My electrical wiring is awful in my apartment, so I'm going to let others grab the deal...

I used to sell these at RadioShack. Do not buy these if you live in any sort of apartment or condo or townhouse. Interference will make them impractical to use.

Thanks OP. Couldn't talk myself into these when they were $39 apiece, but now...hmmm...

Assuming you can find $10 worth of filler, don't forget the $10 off $50 coupon from the Entertainment books. Of course the $10 off $20 coupon from store closings would be even better.

ktg said: Thanks OP. Couldn't talk myself into these when they were $39 apiece, but now...hmmm...

Assuming you can find $10 worth of filler, don't forget the $10 off $50 coupon from the Entertainment books. Of course the $10 off $20 coupon from store closings would be even better.



Doesn't say "web only" and when I checked there were stores near me that supposedly had them. . .the rub is they might not be for the online price. ..won't hurt to check though. . .

Just picked up one at a nearby Radio Shack...the only one they had left and at the web price. It feels like good quality. Speaker impedance is standard 8 ohms. Now for the mod.

Thx OP.<img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0>

I just picked up the last one at the Ypsilanti/Ann Arbor Roundtree store. (Posting to save anyone a trip if they were planning on checking there)


Thanks OP!

The modification works great! This is a pretty nice amp for it's price. (Obviously not audiophile, far from it, but for computer speakers, it's great).

I might see about picking up another. I'd like 4 channels. I'll be using the amp with a pair of the Polk's next time they go on sale.

(Just had an error in sending, hopefully it doesn't double post)

That is true, but there are inexpensive (~$50) bridges that will join the two legs Tin your breaker box, making it a single network for powerline applications like those. There is also an isolator you can use to keep signals "inside", and rejecting outside interference. Of course by that time it's not such a bargain anymore...


htse said: Even in a standalone house, there are usually 2 110/120v input power lines, making most houses essentially have a "two-parts" powerline network. Interference or chance of out-of-sync increases if the transmitter and receiver are in the different parts of the "network" as the signal has to jump over to the other side at the main junction/fuse box.

This applies to x10 network, powerline ethernet network, and this sound transmitting network.

Hope this make sense in this very condensed explanation.



zephyrprime said: mmarcuse said:
Thanks for the info, I think I'll pass. My electrical wiring is awful in my apartment, so I'm going to let others grab the deal...

I used to sell these at RadioShack. Do not buy these if you live in any sort of apartment or condo or townhouse. Interference will make them impractical to use.

what kind of cable used on the receiver audio out port??

RCA or 3.5mm cable??

Can someone upload a picture of the BACK of the amp?


Nevermind...here's the info you want to know:

Inputs 2 x RCA(Line in)
Outputs 2 x Post Terminal(Speaker Out)

HEY!!

I was wondering if these were loud enough ... but so I turned the knob all the way up and, crack! It broke. They chased me out of the store.


I bought the transmitter, the reciever and the speakers all for $70. Can you also tell me how to use these speakers normally rather than using them through the electrical outlet i.e. how to connect them to the reciever? and is it that the transmitter is redundant in this condition? I think that the speakers can be used as reciever+speakers if someone can help modify them the way tschanrm did.


tschanrm said: In the fatwallet spirit, here's how you can modify the Accurian Amplified Receiver so you can use it just like a regular Amplifier. Normally, you can only get an audio signal from the powerline to the receiver. What you will be doing is unplugging the powerline input, and plugging in the "audio out" connection to where the powerline input originally went. Keep in mind that by doing this you can no longer receive audio signals from the powerline transmitter. This is really easy to do:

STEPS

1. Flip the Accurian Receiver over and remove the four rubber feet on the bottom.
2. Use a Philips screwdriver and remove the four screws located underneath the rubber feet, and also remove the fifth screw located on the underside as well (the fifth screw is uncovered).
3. Remove the top Accurian cover. The front part of the cover is held on by some sticky foam, so don't be afraid to pull hard.
4. Unplug both the powerline input and the "audio out" input. Both are circled here in yellow:

Step 4

5. Plug the "audio out" input into where the powerline input orginally was. This picture circles the "audio out" input and where to plug it in (it's the red/white/black connector and it connects to the outer most connection on the board) :

Step 5

6. Put the cover back on, put the screws back in (there are five), and put the rubber feet back on.

Done!

You can now use the "audio out" plug on the back as an audio input instead:

Audio In

Thanks for the deal OP!
Not sure if I even need them, but picked them up anyway just because it seems like a great deal. There was one set left at my local RS but the shelf tag still read $37.XX (?) for the receiver. No tag at all for the sender. Asked for whatever they had in the store that was the cheapest to add onto the order, and then used my $10 off $40 Entertainment book coupon (knew I was saving that thing for a reason <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-tongue.gif" border=0> ).

The look on The CSR's face was priceless. He actually slapped himself in the head on seeing both prices!! First he looked like he was trying to figure out how I hacked the price in their system, then he must've examined that coupon for a good 3 minutes trying to figure out some way to not let me use it. And I KNEW he was asking himself how this deal got by him. I thought I was finally going to have to pry them out of his hand after he bagged them.

Made my day!! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-happy.gif" border=0>

To answer some questions:

-No, this is a regular class A/B amp. Use of 8ohm speakers is recommended, but you could probably use 8-16 ohm speakers without much issue. Do not use 4 ohm speakers, it would overload the amp.

-The back of the amp looks excactly like this:

Back Pic

-And lastly, you may be able to mod the powered speakers, but I imagine you would need to solder some rca connections on instead of just flipping two cables.

OOS (online) for both units.

I was hoping this was something I could use to transmit audio from my PC to my home stereo.

tschanrm said: You can easily modify the Amplifer receiver to accept an analog input, instead of the powerline input. $20 for a 25x2 amp seems hot to me.
I'm sure this could be useful to some people, but just note that, I would guess, that rating is 25x2 Max, so RMS rating (to compare to how decent amps are rated) maybe 12.5x2, so in actuality, considering the quality here (noname Chinese?), you might be getting about 5 watts of unclean power per channel?
Freq response 50Hz-20KHz, Distortion <1.5%, S/N >60 dB.
Also it says 25 watts *line level* ouput, which technically would make it a preamp.

Curious. How much effect from lightning in the distance. I get too much static in my existing wireless speaker system for Florida!

The back of the unit says 25W RMS/50W Max/Channel

25 continuous, 50 max x 2

Anyone happen to find more information on modifications for these?
One of the links in the thread mentioned the possibility of replacing a few components to achieve better sound/quality/power. I'm not experienced enough to figure out replacement parts, but I could surely replace parts if told which are suitable to be used. I'd love to be able to use this amp without any concern of overloading..

Slickone said: I was hoping this was something I could use to transmit audio from my PC to my home stereo.



The RCA Lyra RD900W system is exactly what you are looking for. Connects to PC via a USB connection, select it as your sound card, and you are done. No need to the bundled software, or honestly the remote control that comes with it. YMMV on the remote working without the less than stellar software that comes with it. Anywhoo, fidelity is excellent as is signal coverage.

These have been going on sale for dirt cheap, so you may want to check from time to time. Just do a google for Lyra RD900W

GrimNinja said: The back of the unit says 25W RMS/50W Max/Channel

25 continuous, 50 max x 2

Anyone happen to find more information on modifications for these?
One of the links in the thread mentioned the possibility of replacing a few components to achieve better sound/quality/power. I'm not experienced enough to figure out replacement parts, but I could surely replace parts if told which are suitable to be used. I'd love to be able to use this amp without any concern of overloading..


Honest suggestion, if you need a small power amp, buy a cheap used receiver. Anything of any known Hifi name brand used on FeeBay will have more real world power.

I bought both a transmitter and speakers today. I used the $10 if $20 store closing coupon on both purchases. She let me bring the speakers to the car and come back in for the next sale.

FYI,
I cut the cable off an old pair of headphones that had an 1/8" stereo plug on the end. I was able to add this to the speakers amplifier wiring and it worked fine. I used the laptop headphone output to generate a signal. Having a wire with a headphone plug coming out the back of the speaker was how I pictured using these anyway. I could plug this into a ipod or adapt it to a Roku M500 for playing music in the garage. I didn't have a spare set of speakers to use so this gave me an amplified set for $20.
I can't comment on the quality yet, as all the work laptop had was a file encoded at 16 kbps.

Could you let us know how/where you connect the cut off headphone cable to the Accurian Speaker/receiver? Do you have to open the receiver unit in the back of the speaker?
Thanks,

Kroger said: I bought both a transmitter and speakers today. I used the $10 if $20 store closing coupon on both purchases. She let me bring the speakers to the car and come back in for the next sale.

FYI,
I cut the cable off an old pair of headphones that had an 1/8" stereo plug on the end. I was able to add this to the speakers amplifier wiring and it worked fine. I used the laptop headphone output to generate a signal. Having a wire with a headphone plug coming out the back of the speaker was how I pictured using these anyway. I could plug this into a ipod or adapt it to a Roku M500 for playing music in the garage. I didn't have a spare set of speakers to use so this gave me an amplified set for $20.
I can't comment on the quality yet, as all the work laptop had was a file encoded at 16 kbps.

FYI,
I decided to install a 1/8" stereo phone jack in the back. When you plug something into this jack it will disconnect the homeplug signal and route your audio input. Maybe the homeplug transmitter will work fine in my house so I don't want to totally disable it. It is pretty simple inside the back of the speaker.

I removed the back of the amplified speaker and there was a ST&T reciever module which had a cable sending the audio out signals to a switch on the back. Then a 2'nd cable goes from this switch to the amplifier board. The switch was to select if you wanted stereo, left, or right channels going to both speakers (something like that). The connnector on the amplifier board that this 2'nd cable plugs into is silk screened with L G G R to let you know what each wire has for a signal. The two grounds were tied together on the back of the amplifier module. I'm just going to tap into this cable with this phone plug jack (RadioShack part # 274-0246).

This way I can connect a MP3 player with a cable with a 1/8" stereo plug on each end. If I decide to hook up my Roku M500 or small boombox output then I can use a RCA to 1/8" stereo plug cable. Maybe they sound like crap and all this won't matter. At least I pacified my Fatwallet addiction for a couple of days.

Hope this helps.

thekid72 said: Slickone said: I was hoping this was something I could use to transmit audio from my PC to my home stereo.



The RCA Lyra RD900W system is exactly what you are looking for. Connects to PC via a USB connection, select it as your sound card, and you are done. No need to the bundled software, or honestly the remote control that comes with it. YMMV on the remote working without the less than stellar software that comes with it. Anywhoo, fidelity is excellent as is signal coverage.

These have been going on sale for dirt cheap, so yo may want to check from time to time. Just do a google for Lyra RD900W

Thanks. From what I read, it sends whatever MusicMatch plays. How would you get it to work with other software? I want something I can send any audio, like say from a web based player (ie. Sirius). Also does that transfer digitally or would it be RF?

Kroger said: FYI,
I decided to install a 1/8" stereo phone jack in the back. When you plug something into this jack it will disconnect the homeplug signal and route your audio input. Maybe the homeplug transmitter will work fine in my house so I don't want to totally disable it. It is pretty simple inside the back of the speaker.

I removed the back of the amplified speaker and there was a ST&T reciever module which had a cable sending the audio out signals to a switch on the back. Then a 2'nd cable goes from this switch to the amplifier board. The switch was to select if you wanted stereo, left, or right channels going to both speakers (something like that). The connnector on the amplifier board that this 2'nd cable plugs into is silk screened with L G G R to let you know what each wire has for a signal. The two grounds were tied together on the back of the amplifier module. I'm just going to tap into this cable with this phone plug jack (RadioShack part # 274-0246).

This way I can connect a MP3 player with a cable with a 1/8" stereo plug on each end. If I decide to hook up my Roku M500 or small boombox output then I can use a RCA to 1/8" stereo plug cable. Maybe they sound like crap and all this won't matter. At least I pacified my Fatwallet addiction for a couple of days.

Hope this helps.


Thanks for the info.
Correctly me if I'm wrong. You will cut the second cable in the middle and connect the RS phone plug in the middle of this cable then place the phone plug outside the speaker.

Back in stock for online purchase

For those that have one, how hot does the heat sink on the back of your receiver get? I'm just trying it for the first time (unmodded) and the heat sync is REALLY hot. Can't touch it for more than a second.. Anyone else's like this?

Mine doesnt seem to be working...I used a wire to connect from L R output of my subwoofer to the sender. Then connected the surround speakers to the L and R on the receiver. All I hear is some gargling sound. I tried all options of flipping the wires to all sides. No luck. I even used the RCA cable to connect from my AUDIO receiver output to the input of the sender. No luck. Am I missing something...Please help...



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