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posted 47 years ago by
rtrdealin
Cranky Member

Newegg has the ABIT IP35-E LGA 775 Intel P35 ATX Intel Motherboard on sale again with a $30.00 rebate for those that missed it the last time. Nice MB to go with those $199 Q6600 cpu's everyone bought from Microcenter.

Motherboard Link
Old (2/26/2008 - 3/15/2008) Rebate Link

Edit - 3/16/2008

Newegg has a new rebate (and $10.00 discount still showing) for the motherboard that runs till 3/31/2008. Different offer# on this new rebate, so if you like the MB and need a second one (like me), might be a good time to jump.

New Rebate Link (3/16/2008 - 3/31/2008)

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Nice deal but I can't do it. Those dells are so cheap, this mobo, the Quad 6600 and ram costs almost the same as a whole Dell system.

would jump on this if it only had raid... good deal tho op!

clearanceman said: Nice deal but I can't do it. Those dells are so cheap, this mobo, the Quad 6600 and ram costs almost the same as a whole Dell system.

You get much better parts for the same price AND you get to overclock the Q6600 and ram to it's potential. The Dell system probably doesn't have enough juice in the PSU to run a high end video card either. The tradeoff, you have to invest time to build the system.

Cheap price, if you're a real penny pincher. (I am, so I've been looking real hard at this board). Overall, this may be about the best Intel based mb for the after rebate price, if you're patient and experienced, and don't want to spend $30 more on a higher rated board like the Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L You may also want to consider an Abit board that's the next highest rated (but more than twice the price at $170 plus shipping), Abit IP35 Pro
EDIT: Forgot to mention that the rebate recently expired on the more expensive Abit IP35 Pro above. Maybe it'll return?

(I love Newegg, and try to buy my components based on the best user ratings within my price range. Get familiar with how to navigate Newegg's products and sort by price, rating, etc.)

That said, (according to Newegg User reviews), the OP's Abit IP35-E mb has or has had several potential issues:
1. Many complain of a double boot BIOS issue (which may be fixed with certain BIOS updates).
2. Some Users complain about IDE drive issues, from not recognizing certain hard drives, to not being bootable to an IDE optical drive. This may be a chip issue, or a "loose nut on the keyboard" (user) issue. Check your IDE jumpers and have SATA drives ready.
3. Others complain about the motherboard not booting / or DOA - which, in some cases, some seem to think is the boards default memory voltage settings and/or pickiness about memory. Better check the manufacturers approved memory list before buying, and if yours doesn't boot with approved memory, take out 1 stick temporarily, and/or check/change memory voltage in the BIOS.
4. North Heatsink size gets in the way of some CPU coolers. Modify or use different cooler or heatsink.
5. Some may have had setup problems initially with USB keyboards - have a PS2 backup handy, and/or check your keyboard BIOS settings.
6. One person complained that the board wouldn't boot with their USB hard drive connected. Perhaps, but this reminds me that when you're setting up a new motherboard (and installing Windows) for the very first time, it's just wise not to attach any "extra" components yet. You only want the bare essentials installed and connected, to reduce any potential conflicts and unknown or unrecognized system devices. After Windows is installed and all major components seem to be working and the system is stable, and you have installed the latest chipset driver and perhaps latest audio and video drivers, then try adding additional devices (one at a time), like printers, cams, external hard drives, USB flash drives, scanners, and additonal expansion cards. This helps to pinpoint and troubleshoot any issues.
7. A couple early buyers noted bad capacitors - but this may be solved now, (if you don't get old stock).
8. Some FWer's complain of Abits rebate, and others complain of their RMA process, as seen in the earlier FW post on this deal. Previous ABIT IP35-E deal
Also, unlike some w/ Newegg's standard warranty, this particular motherboard comes w/ Newegg's 30 day warranty (afterward it is covered by Abit). And, according to Newegg's Return Policies, Newegg will not take back a product w/out a UPC - So, w/out missing the deadline, don't send your UPC in for the rebate until you have all your components, and your motherboard is working. When you send your rebate, photocopy everything, send via trackable service, and mark the expected rebate date on a calendar.

Finally, I've seen other people advise that it's good to clear the BIOS and reset to defaults, when you get a new motherboard, to clear out any potential file corruption that may have occurred after manufacturing, while in the storing or shipping stages.

pentiuman said: Cheap price, if you're a real penny pincher. (I am, so I've been looking real hard at this board). Overall, this may be about the best Intel based mb for the after rebate price, if you're patient and experienced, and don't want to spend $30 more on a higher rated board like the Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L

(I love Newegg, and try to buy my components based on the best user ratings within my price range. Get familiar with how to navigate Newegg's products and sort by price, rating, etc.)

That said, (according to Newegg User reviews), this Abit mb has or has had several potential issues:
1. Many complain of a double boot BIOS issue (which may be fixed with certain BIOS updates).
2. Some Users complain about IDE drive issues, from not recognizing certain hard drives, to not being bootable to an IDE optical drive. This may be a chip issue, or a "loose nut on the keyboard" (user) issue. Check your IDE jumpers and have SATA drives ready.
3. Others complain about the motherboard not booting / or DOA - which, in some cases, some seem to think is the boards default memory voltage settings and/or pickiness about memory. Better check the manufacturers approved memory list before buying, and if yours doesn't boot with approved memory, take out 1 stick temporarily, and/or check/change memory voltage in the BIOS.
4. North Heatsink size gets in the way of some CPU coolers. Modify or use different cooler or heatsink.
5. Some may have had setup problems initially with USB keyboards - have a PS2 backup handy, and/or check your keyboard BIOS settings.
6. One person complained that the board wouldn't boot with their USB hard drive connected. Perhaps, but this reminds me that when you're setting up a new motherboard (and installing Windows) for the very first time, it's just wise not to attach any "extra" components yet. You only want the bare essentials installed and connected, to reduce any potential conflicts and unknown or unrecognized system devices. After Windows is installed and all major components seem to be working and the system is stable, and you have installed the latest chipset driver and perhaps latest audio and video drivers, then try adding additional devices (one at a time), like printers, cams, external hard drives, USB flash drives, scanners, and additonal expansion cards. This helps to pinpoint and troubleshoot any issues.
7. A couple early buyers noted bad capacitors - but this may be solved now, (if you don't get old stock).

Finally, I've seen other people advise that it's good to clear the BIOS and reset to defaults, when you get a new motherboard, to clear out any potential file corruption that may have occurred after manufacturing, while in the storing or shipping stages.


Nice post! I might have to go ahead and get this mobo for its OC'ing potential. Not sure if I want to pay for a Q6600 though since others are having such great success OC'ing the dual cores.

pentiuman said: Cheap price, if you're a real penny pincher. (I am, so I've been looking real hard at this board). Overall, this may be about the best Intel based mb for the after rebate price, if you're patient and experienced, and don't want to spend $30 more on a higher rated board like the Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L You may also want to consider an Abit board that's the next highest rated (but more than twice the price at $170 plus shipping), Abit IP35 Pro

(I love Newegg, and try to buy my components based on the best user ratings within my price range. Get familiar with how to navigate Newegg's products and sort by price, rating, etc.)

That said, (according to Newegg User reviews), the OP's Abit IP35-E mb has or has had several potential issues:
1. Many complain of a double boot BIOS issue (which may be fixed with certain BIOS updates)....
.
5. Some may have had setup problems initially with USB keyboards - have a PS2 backup handy, and/or check your keyboard BIOS settings....
.
Finally, I've seen other people advise that it's good to clear the BIOS and reset to defaults, when you get a new motherboard, to clear out any potential file corruption that may have occurred after manufacturing, while in the storing or shipping stages.


I've had this board for several months and have experienced:
#1-double boot. Yes, but not a big deal.
#5-USB keyboard. Was an issue setting up the MB for the first time when working with the BIOS.
Finally-I agree. Always when in doubt clear the bios. I've had a few situations that were fixed by clearing the BIOS.

I hear it is a great motherboard to base a hackintosh build on

a little off topic but about 3 - 4 months ago there was an article in 1 of the computer mags and on their site about building a computer i think it was titled vest bang for the buck but i cant find it i fope some1 else might of seen it and can help me, thanks please pm me

pentiuman said: Cheap price, if you're a real penny pincher. (I am, so I've been looking real hard at this board). Overall, this may be about the best Intel based mb for the after rebate price, if you're patient and experienced, and don't want to spend $30 more on a higher rated board like the Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L You may also want to consider an Abit board that's the next highest rated (but more than twice the price at $170 plus shipping), Abit IP35 Pro
EDIT: Forgot to mention that the rebate recently expired on the more expensive Abit IP35 Pro above. Maybe it'll return?

(I love Newegg, and try to buy my components based on the best user ratings within my price range. Get familiar with how to navigate Newegg's products and sort by price, rating, etc.)

That said, (according to Newegg User reviews), the OP's Abit IP35-E mb has or has had several potential issues:
1. Many complain of a double boot BIOS issue (which may be fixed with certain BIOS updates).
This has been fixed since BIOS 13 a long time ago. You need /wb option during flashing to solve double-post, otherwise you only update BIOS version without solving double-post problem. But new batches mostly come with >13 BIOS, so not needed anyway.
2. Some Users complain about IDE drive issues, from not recognizing certain hard drives, to not being bootable to an IDE optical drive. This may be a chip issue, or a "loose nut on the keyboard" (user) issue. Check your IDE jumpers and have SATA drives ready.
The reason is IDE devices are listed at the bottom of the bootable list. Many did not realize it. I actually have a IDE only setup with XP SP2.
3. Others complain about the motherboard not booting / or DOA - which, in some cases, some seem to think is the boards default memory voltage settings and/or pickiness about memory. Better check the manufacturers approved memory list before buying, and if yours doesn't boot with approved memory, take out 1 stick temporarily, and/or check/change memory voltage in the BIOS.
4. North Heatsink size gets in the way of some CPU coolers. Modify or use different cooler or heatsink.
5. Some may have had setup problems initially with USB keyboards - have a PS2 backup handy, and/or check your keyboard BIOS settings.
6. One person complained that the board wouldn't boot with their USB hard drive connected. Perhaps, but this reminds me that when you're setting up a new motherboard (and installing Windows) for the very first time, it's just wise not to attach any "extra" components yet. You only want the bare essentials installed and connected, to reduce any potential conflicts and unknown or unrecognized system devices. After Windows is installed and all major components seem to be working and the system is stable, and you have installed the latest chipset driver and perhaps latest audio and video drivers, then try adding additional devices (one at a time), like printers, cams, external hard drives, USB flash drives, scanners, and additonal expansion cards. This helps to pinpoint and troubleshoot any issues.
7. A couple early buyers noted bad capacitors - but this may be solved now, (if you don't get old stock).
Problematic surface-mounted transistor has been replaced but a new one. confirmed in the previous batch from Newegg. If you are unlucky, this has a cold-boot problem, no booting <63F. A hairdryer blowing through my P180 case top fan solves it when this rare event happens :p
8. Some FWer's complain of Abits rebate, and others complain of their RMA process, as seen in the earlier FW post on this deal. Previous ABIT IP35-E deal
Also, unlike some w/ Newegg's standard warranty, this particular motherboard comes w/ Newegg's 30 day warranty (afterward it is covered by Abit). And, according to Newegg's Return Policies, Newegg will not take back a product w/out a UPC - So, w/out missing the deadline, don't send your UPC in for the rebate until you have all your components, and your motherboard is working. When you send your rebate, photocopy everything, send via trackable service, and mark the expected rebate date on a calendar.

Finally, I've seen other people advise that it's good to clear the BIOS and reset to defaults, when you get a new motherboard, to clear out any potential file corruption that may have occurred after manufacturing, while in the storing or shipping stages.

Jimmy319 said: clearanceman said: Nice deal but I can't do it. Those dells are so cheap, this mobo, the Quad 6600 and ram costs almost the same as a whole Dell system.

You get much better parts for the same price AND you get to overclock the Q6600 and ram to it's potential. The Dell system probably doesn't have enough juice in the PSU to run a high end video card either. The tradeoff, you have to invest time to build the system.


The PS angle is silly. I have several antecs I got for $30 after MIR from FW deals. I can just put a nice 500 watt antec in the Dell. Also, if you really want to overclock the CPU, you can do a pad mod on most of them. Just get a 800mhz CPU and pad mod to 1066 or 1333 if it will do it.

clearanceman said: Jimmy319 said: clearanceman said: Nice deal but I can't do it. Those dells are so cheap, this mobo, the Quad 6600 and ram costs almost the same as a whole Dell system.

You get much better parts for the same price AND you get to overclock the Q6600 and ram to it's potential. The Dell system probably doesn't have enough juice in the PSU to run a high end video card either. The tradeoff, you have to invest time to build the system.


The PS angle is silly. I have several antecs I got for $30 after MIR from FW deals. I can just put a nice 500 watt antec in the Dell. Also, if you really want to overclock the CPU, you can do a pad mod on most of them. Just get a 800mhz CPU and pad mod to 1066 or 1333 if it will do it.


I think both of you have valid points in that:

clearanceman - Yes, (in addition to other benefits), you can often get a complete Dell for the same cost as building it yourself - in fact, sometimes it's cheaper to get a Dell, when you include the value of Windows. (And a better choice for those less experienced in building PC's).

But, regarding the PSU issue, many Dell's have proprietary power supplies, not standard ATX. (Note, you didn't list a specific Dell in your post.) Also, Dell just recently went to using standard PSU's and parts in their XPS series. (Thank you Dell). And yes, you may be able to do a pad mod to overclock some.

However, as Jimmy319 suggests, most Dell's do not have the additional overclocking abilities that a custom motherboard offers and which are needed to reach the highest overclock possible.

Jimmy319 is also right that it is certainly quicker to get a pre-built Dell than order the components seperately and put in the time (and risk) in building it yourself. And, he's right in that Dell's power supplies (whether standard or not), are traditionally underpowered, and may be unable to run a high end video card, if at all, for any extended period. If it works and you reach a power supplies maximum output, my understanding is that you can then encounter stability issues.

That said, (according to Newegg User reviews), the OP's Abit IP35-E mb has or has had several potential issues:
1. Many complain of a double boot BIOS issue (which may be fixed with certain BIOS updates).
This has been fixed since BIOS 13 a long time ago. You need /wb option during flashing to solve double-post, otherwise you only update BIOS version without solving double-post problem. But new batches mostly come with >13 BIOS, so not needed anyway.
2. Some Users complain about IDE drive issues, from not recognizing certain hard drives, to not being bootable to an IDE optical drive. This may be a chip issue, or a "loose nut on the keyboard" (user) issue. Check your IDE jumpers and have SATA drives ready.
The reason is IDE devices are listed at the bottom of the bootable list. Many did not realize it. I actually have a IDE only setup with XP SP2.
3. Others complain about the motherboard not booting / or DOA - which, in some cases, some seem to think is the boards default memory voltage settings and/or pickiness about memory. Better check the manufacturers approved memory list before buying, and if yours doesn't boot with approved memory, take out 1 stick temporarily, and/or check/change memory voltage in the BIOS.
4. North Heatsink size gets in the way of some CPU coolers. Modify or use different cooler or heatsink.
5. Some may have had setup problems initially with USB keyboards - have a PS2 backup handy, and/or check your keyboard BIOS settings.


I just completed an install with this MB, using it now. My first FW IP35-E post

1. Mine did double boot when first starting. Other forum posts said to update BIOS and keep power on to the PS all the time. I have not updated yet but keep power on and no double boot.
2. No problems with IDE drives.
3. There is an 8 pin power connector that supplies power to the CPU [ATX12V1]. Either connect a 4 pin or 8 pin there depending on your PS. I connected a 6 pin and the MB would not power on.
4. Mine did with the Rosewill SP fan but it just touches, no pressure. It should not get hot enough to melt any plastic, if it does, I'm in trouble anyway.
5. My USB keyboard was not recognized initially yesterday during power up and logon. So I chose another user with no logon and it finally worked. After WinVista updates, you won't have any problems. And that is all I know right now.

pentiuman said: clearanceman said: Jimmy319 said: clearanceman said: Nice deal but I can't do it. Those dells are so cheap, this mobo, the Quad 6600 and ram costs almost the same as a whole Dell system.

You get much better parts for the same price AND you get to overclock the Q6600 and ram to it's potential. The Dell system probably doesn't have enough juice in the PSU to run a high end video card either. The tradeoff, you have to invest time to build the system.


The PS angle is silly. I have several antecs I got for $30 after MIR from FW deals. I can just put a nice 500 watt antec in the Dell. Also, if you really want to overclock the CPU, you can do a pad mod on most of them. Just get a 800mhz CPU and pad mod to 1066 or 1333 if it will do it.


I think both of you have valid points in that:

clearanceman - Yes, (in addition to other benefits), you can often get a complete Dell for the same cost as building it yourself - in fact, sometimes it's cheaper to get a Dell, when you include the value of Windows. (And a better choice for those less experienced in building PC's).

But, regarding the PSU issue, many Dell's have proprietary power supplies, not standard ATX. (Note, you didn't list a specific Dell in your post.) Also, Dell just recently went to using standard PSU's and parts in their XPS series. (Thank you Dell). And yes, you may be able to do a pad mod to overclock some.

However, as Jimmy319 suggests, most Dell's do not have the additional overclocking abilities that a custom motherboard offers and which are needed to reach the highest overclock possible.

Jimmy319 is also right that it is certainly quicker to get a pre-built Dell than order the components seperately and put in the time (and risk) in building it yourself. And, he's right in that Dell's power supplies (whether standard or not), are traditionally underpowered, and may be unable to run a high end video card, if at all, for any extended period. If it works and you reach a power supplies maximum output, my understanding is that you can then encounter stability issues.


Consider that my 4600 took a standard ATX power supply with no modifications, I just put it in, and it is a relatively old model. Also, my 400sc had a reverse plug in but a few snips of the sheetmetal and it took an Antec just fine also. My 400sc 3.2 is now running a SATA DVD, CDRW, 250 gig SATA HD, 1 gig ram, and X1950 pro agp card. It has reached the end of the road upgrade wise but I bought it on a fatwallet deal in 2002. And it was half the cost of the OEM CPU at the time. Not bad at all. It's not as great pricewise with Dell now, but you can still get a whole machine (without monitor) for what a mobo, CPU and ram would cost. Not to mention your time. I exclusively built my own computers from 1993 to 2001, but haven't built one since I figured I could get a Dell with a warranty for less than I could buy parts and build my own. I do understand the desire to overclock but pad mods have even mostly fixed that. You are right, there are many more options with a builder board, ram timings, fsb adjustments, etc. You'll never get a Dell clock for clock as fast as a builder set up. But it is close enough for me. To each his own.

If you do buy this board, and try installing Linux on it with a SATA drive, you may have a hard time. The issue is that SATA numbers 1 thru 4 are "double booked" on the IRQ (yes, I know the IP35-E does not have connectors for SATA numbers 3 and 4). The way to get Linux to install is to plug your hard drive in SATA connector 6 or 5. It worked for me (using the latest Ubuntu). I remember seeing this posted on some other site when I was looking for answers to what seemed to be a Linux/IP35-e SATA problem.) Hope this helps someone else!

clearanceman said: Consider that my 4600 took a standard ATX power supply with no modifications, I just put it in, and it is a relatively old model. Also, my 400sc had a reverse plug in but a few snips of the sheetmetal and it took an Antec just fine also. My 400sc 3.2 is now running a SATA DVD, CDRW, 250 gig SATA HD, 1 gig ram, and X1950 pro agp card. It has reached the end of the road upgrade wise but I bought it on a fatwallet deal in 2002. And it was half the cost of the OEM CPU at the time. Not bad at all. It's not as great pricewise with Dell now, but you can still get a whole machine (without monitor) for what a mobo, CPU and ram would cost. Not to mention your time. I exclusively built my own computers from 1993 to 2001, but haven't built one since I figured I could get a Dell with a warranty for less than I could buy parts and build my own. I do understand the desire to overclock but pad mods have even mostly fixed that. You are right, there are many more options with a builder board, ram timings, fsb adjustments, etc. You'll never get a Dell clock for clock as fast as a builder set up. But it is close enough for me. To each his own.

Yeah, again, you're right that some Dell's do take a standard ATX PSU - I too have a Dell 4600 (now used by my son), and I too had to put in a new standard PSU (the Dell one failed at 18 months, and was somewhat underpowered given the # of drives and devices I used). - And, although I could've built myself a new PC, I too found that it was cheaper at that time (and easier) to just buy a Dell. On the other hand, my older Dell Dimension 8100 - w/ the lowest P4 ever made at 1300Mhz. (and cost over $2,000 new around 1999 and uses the mucho expensive and proprietary RDRAM), has a proprietary PSU - and when it fails it will be too expensive ($120) and outdated to fix.

You're also right that sometimes things just need a little modification to work, like perhaps your 400sc's reverse plug. (I didn't know that exactly - I had read that on some Dell's they wired the PSU connection totally different and it couldn't be made to work).

So, I'm happy that it appears that we agree on the facts, and only our opinions of what's best given our particular needs and preferences differs. In other words, the "temperature" of the deal depends on the individual. IMO - If you have some experience or are technically inclined, it can be a great choice for the price. But if you want a motherboard that likely has less potential issues - pay more for a different model (or like you say - buy a prebuilt Dell).

I have had this board since November and it has been great. I am running on one of the 13 beta bioses and I have no issues with double booting. I went real cheap and got an Intel E2180 (Conroe w/ 1MB L2) and have no issues overclocking it up to 3.2 Ghz. I went with a Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro CPU HSF. This fan will not fit without either bending the bottom fins on the heatsink or swapping the chipset heatsink. I had an old Zalman chipset heatsink which I ended up installing so I didn't have to mess with the HSF.

So far I have had no stability or heat issues with it being overclocking since getting it and I mostly play games (COD4, Bioshock, Gears of War, etc). I spent $260 for the upgrade which included this board + E2180 + 2GB G.Skill and the Freezer HSF. Right now all 4 are $241 before the rebate, so $211 + ship after the rebate which is very cheap upgrade.

I have the IP35-E board and only paid about $75 from Newegg last Sept.

The board runs great with the E6750 and I've had no problems
booting off the optical drive mentioned. It posted great scores
on the benchmarks.

As for the double boot it's hardly a problem...don't even hardly
notice it anymore.

pentiuman said: clearanceman said: Consider that my 4600 took a standard ATX power supply with no modifications, I just put it in, and it is a relatively old model. Also, my 400sc had a reverse plug in but a few snips of the sheetmetal and it took an Antec just fine also. My 400sc 3.2 is now running a SATA DVD, CDRW, 250 gig SATA HD, 1 gig ram, and X1950 pro agp card. It has reached the end of the road upgrade wise but I bought it on a fatwallet deal in 2002. And it was half the cost of the OEM CPU at the time. Not bad at all. It's not as great pricewise with Dell now, but you can still get a whole machine (without monitor) for what a mobo, CPU and ram would cost. Not to mention your time. I exclusively built my own computers from 1993 to 2001, but haven't built one since I figured I could get a Dell with a warranty for less than I could buy parts and build my own. I do understand the desire to overclock but pad mods have even mostly fixed that. You are right, there are many more options with a builder board, ram timings, fsb adjustments, etc. You'll never get a Dell clock for clock as fast as a builder set up. But it is close enough for me. To each his own.

Yeah, again, you're right that some Dell's do take a standard ATX PSU - I too have a Dell 4600 (now used by my son), and I too had to put in a new standard PSU (the Dell one failed at 18 months, and was somewhat underpowered given the # of drives and devices I used). - And, although I could've built myself a new PC, I too found that it was cheaper at that time (and easier) to just buy a Dell. On the other hand, my older Dell Dimension 8100 - w/ the lowest P4 ever made at 1300Mhz. (and cost over $2,000 new around 1999 and uses the mucho expensive and proprietary RDRAM), has a proprietary PSU - and when it fails it will be too expensive ($120) and outdated to fix.

You're also right that sometimes things just need a little modification to work, like perhaps your 400sc's reverse plug. (I didn't know that exactly - I had read that on some Dell's they wired the PSU connection totally different and it couldn't be made to work).

So, I'm happy that it appears that we agree on the facts, and only our opinions of what's best given our particular needs and preferences differs. In other words, the "temperature" of the deal depends on the individual. IMO - If you have some experience or are technically inclined, it can be a great choice for the price. But if you want a motherboard that likely has less potential issues - pay more for a different model (or like you say - buy a prebuilt Dell).


I am enjoying this discussion. I wish every other discussion is this civil and informed....

itsfree said:
I am enjoying this discussion. I wish every other discussion is this civil and informed....


+1

Thanks for the info guys.

I have this board paired with the e2180 overclocked to 3.2. I picked this up the last time it had a rebate and have no regrets about buying it. I did have the double boot issue on mine but was easily fixed with a bios update. No issues installing this MassCool heat sink.. In fact, it was the easiest heatsink I've ever installed.

shadow3277 said: I have this board paired with the e2180 overclocked to 3.2. I picked this up the last time it had a rebate and have no regrets about buying it. I did have the double boot issue on mine but was easily fixed with a bios update. No issues installing this MassCool heat sink.. In fact, it was the easiest heatsink I've ever installed.

I have the same combination. You have any easy tutorials that describe the BIOS update and OC procedures?

jeffc said: shadow3277 said: I have this board paired with the e2180 overclocked to 3.2. I picked this up the last time it had a rebate and have no regrets about buying it. I did have the double boot issue on mine but was easily fixed with a bios update. No issues installing this MassCool heat sink.. In fact, it was the easiest heatsink I've ever installed.

I have the same combination. You have any easy tutorials that describe the BIOS update and OC procedures?


Here is a general overclocking guide. I remember seeing a thread over at the abit forums that shows how to update the BIOS step by step. I stumbled across it when I was researching this board. I don't remember exacty which thread I saw it in. Here's the link.

Here is a good forum thread, the first post hasn't been updated since December but contains very good information. There are still current posts at the end of the thread (2690 posts and counting on it).

Anandtech Thread

FYI this went up in price by $10 as of 3/3. It is now $100 - $30 rebate = $70.

The Gigabyte mobo is starting to look like a better offering.

Warrent said: FYI this went up in price by $10 as of 3/3. It is now $100 - $30 rebate = $70.

The Gigabyte mobo is starting to look like a better offering.


Yeah, I just noticed this price increase at Newegg too. I hate how they micro-manage the prices, sometimes several times a day! (I have written to Newegg about this twice. Their reply is just that they don't have a "price guarantee". Well, that's understandable and reasonable. But still, it's frustrating that they don't keep the same price for even 24 hours! Many times, the price changes between the time I add a product to my electronic "cart", and my check out time several minutes later (after considering the total and getting several products in the cart). Price or advertising errors aside, how come this isn't allowed, or may be considered false advertising at a brick and mortar store? (Raising prices on an item at the cash register AFTER you put it in your cart minutes earlier)??? Can you imagine a brick and mortar employee following you in a store to try to put a new price sticker on a product already in your cart? No. A consumer commonly makes the decision whether or not to buy an item based on the stated price when they see it on the shelf! Somebody needs to petition the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to see that consumers aren't misled in these online transactions!

If you call Newegg after you've purchased and a price increase happenned minutes earlier or later, they will often give you a credit, (but this also requires that you send them an email referencing the credit authorization, and you then have to make sure it was credited on your cc). Newegg doesn't take phone orders, so you can't call them and buy over the phone at an adjusted price.

The price has gone up and down on this board before, so I'm hoping it will drop again (that is if we all refrain from purchasing at the new price). The Internet (and electronic pricing in general) allows retailers to respond rapidly to shifting supply and demand -- which can have good and bad effects for us consumers. This week, if it fails to sell at the new price, Newegg should drop the price again quickly. That is if we're not seeing final inventories for this board (are these rebates about clearance or just maintaining a high volume of sales for Abit?).

Price is back to $60.

I suspect Newegg found few takers for the increased price. Today the Abit IP35-E returned to $89.99 (-30 rebate = 59.99 + shipping). I should probably learn my lesson and buy it now, but I want to wait till the end of the rebate period (which coincides with the turn of the monthly periods of my credit card). Let's hope I don't come to rue this decision.

Can someone describe the double post problem a bit better? I just put together a system with this mother but think I installed the CPU incorrectly--too forcefully.

I've post the problem here, but if some of these symptoms are interrelated, I'd be dying to know.

http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/topic.php?catid=28&threadid=813618&newest=1#last

Should I try reseting the bios?

Thanks
UA

UltimateAtrophy said: Can someone describe the double post problem a bit better?
This is your best bet to get the full scoop: http://forum.abit-usa.com/showthread.php?t=127743

This mb doesnt have the eSata connector/bracket does it?

YankeeRedneck said: This mb doesnt have the eSata connector/bracket does it?

No.



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