Some teens are so arrogant todays.

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A few days ago, some teens was paying for some stuff at Kroger with cash.  They had some change left over that came out of the coin machine.  I thought they forgot so I said you forgot your change, but one of them just shrugged her shoulders and then they all left.  It was about 70something cents.  Took the change to the cashier and she put them in a cup at the counter.

Another incident just now that I was behind a teen at Jack In The Box.  He was getting his money out of his pocket and a couple of quarters fell on the floor just right at his feet.  He stared at them for a few seconds but never pick up.  Paid for his food then left.  I always pick up any pennies I see but seeing this teenager left 2 quarters on the floor I just wonder if these teens think money grows on trees.

SMH.

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A couple months working minimum wage job changes your outlook how you spend or waste money.

At least to some people.

My guess is these teens aren't relying on money they've earned themselves, but money that mommy/daddy gives freely to them, so what's the big deal if they lose a few coins? Because if it was their own money, that they earned themselves, they would probably be much more careful. Haven't learned the value of money, and the importance of saving. If mommy/daddy don't teach them, they will be in for a very rude awakening, once they are on their own.

I had my first job at 14, and opened a bank account with my mom, so I had checks, which she taught me how to use. At 18, the account became mine alone. I'd never toss aside any change, and kept stuff I'd find (like the coin return in pay phones), or change from bus fare left on the seat.

My sisters BF never learned how to handle money, he fritters it away, neglects to pay tickets/fines and bills, then the police/sheriffs and creditors are banging on the door. He tosses change on the floor of the car, only to vacuum it up at the car wash. Meanwhile, my sister goes batty when a shut-off notice comes in the mail because he hasn't paid the city utilities for a few months, or the county sends an arrest threat for failure to pay the tickets/fines. He's always scheming for ways to make quick cash, none of which worked, only resulting in hundred of $$$'s down the drain.

These kids might end up like my sister's 55 yo BF, always broke, chased by those he owes money to. Unless mommy/daddy are stupid enough to keep handing money to their irresponsible offspring.

Well, it seems kids got "standard" these days. They won't take fast-food job anymore. When I worked at fast-food joint back in my days there were a mix of kids from all social background including one that already got accepted to an Ivy school. It's the type of job that make one stay in school because the alternative... well, not so good.

ZenNUTS said:   It's the type of job that make one stay in school because the alternative... well, not so good.
  
When I was 16 I worked a summer stacking sacks of charcoal. Now that was a lesson.

eta: and it snowed every day [/onion belt]

For all you know, this was their stealth attempt at "paying it forward".  Finding 70-cents in the coin return or a couple quarters on the floor could've made someone's day, especially younger kids.  At worst it's laziness not arrogance; what is arrogant is finding some loose change and looking at the person who left it with disdain....

 

ZenNUTS said:   Well, it seems kids got "standard" these days. They won't take fast-food job anymore. When I worked at fast-food joint back in my days there were a mix of kids from all social background including one that already got accepted to an Ivy school. It's the type of job that make one stay in school because the alternative... well, not so good.

My first job, like millions of others, was fast food. Taco Bell. I worked there for about 18 months. A lot of work for low pay. To this very day, as far as the quantity of work, this job was more than any I have ever had. It is, of course, complexity not quantity, that determines pay.

Anyway, if I saw a penny on the ground I wouldn't pick it up. A quarter I would. 70 cents I also would. If someone else wants to leave it on the counter, I'll take it.

burgerwars said:   
ZenNUTS said:   Well, it seems kids got "standard" these days. They won't take fast-food job anymore. When I worked at fast-food joint back in my days there were a mix of kids from all social background including one that already got accepted to an Ivy school. It's the type of job that make one stay in school because the alternative... well, not so good.

My first job, like millions of others, was fast food. Taco Bell. I worked there for about 18 months. A lot of work for low pay. To this very day, as far as the quantity of work, this job was more than any I have ever had. It is, of course, complexity not quantity, that determines pay.

Anyway, if I saw a penny on the ground I wouldn't pick it up. A quarter I would. 70 cents I also would. If someone else wants to leave it on the counter, I'll take it.

  
"See a Penny, pick it up. All day long you'll have good luck!"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AO3kUhgCpCg



Maybe money is not that valuable when you just ask it from your parents.

Maybe its the parents fault for not giving them the lesson of how valuable money is?

ZenNUTS said:   Well, it seems kids got "standard" these days. They won't take fast-food job anymore. When I worked at fast-food joint back in my days there were a mix of kids from all social background including one that already got accepted to an Ivy school. It's the type of job that make one stay in school because the alternative... well, not so good.
  
My job at 14 was delivering advertising circulars through a development every Saturday. I probably walked at least a mile, meandering through that place, and hanging bags on door handles. If it rained, I wore a raincoat, dressed warm in the cold of winter. I spent my mornings assembling them, and rolling and stuffing them in the bags. Spent a few hours delivering them in the afternoon.  My next job at 17 was in a kitchen at a nursing home/retirement community. I didn't do fast food until college. Used to be nursing home and fast food jobs for later shifts, and weekends, were almost exclusively teenagers. Now it's adults without secondary education, trying to pay the bills on minimum wage. Times have changed...

I took my dad to a casino over the weekend.  He saw a guy put a 10 into a cigarette machine for a $9 pack and walk away with a dollar bill hanging from the change slot. He called out to him but was ignored so he took the dollar, ran it up to $13 and left happy.
 

I don't deal with teens anymore for a very long time so I guess seeing things like this makes me wonder for the future generations. 

Yes, it is mostly are parents not teaching their kids the value of money.   However, some teens I know do work hard to earn their money on their own.  But then they also spend it like there's no tomorrow.  They just go to where ever, buy what they want, and pays whatever price at that time.  They don't seem to even think twice about paying $ for something they want.

I've never had the pleasure of working at a fast food or any restaurants.  But I did worked since 16 (it was $2.35 minimum wage back then) and have learned the value of money.  I did spoil my son but also managed to instilled the value and principle of $ in him as he was growing up.  I'm very proud of him.  I just hope that when he have his own children (really wanting grandchildren now ,) he will do the same with them.


 

I grew up in Finland, in a small town famous for its strawberry farms. Every local teen and even pre teen in addition to workers from all around the country, got a summer job planting, weeding and picking strawberries, lasting pretty much the entire school vacation. In picking strawberries, we got paid by the basket; the faster you worked, the more money you made. I recall earning very well but I also recall my aching back and knees. Yet we all did it summer after summer. Fast forward 20-30 years: all farm workers are now brought in from Russia, Poland, Estonia, etc. No neigborhood teens are willing to work in the farms. There are no other summer jobs in this town yet it doesnt seem to bother them- they just do nothing all summer long. I had a longer coversation with a friend who employs about 100 pickers each summer. She told me the local kids, and all Finnish people, find the work way too hard and she had to start getting workers from overseas.
I spent some time in Finland last month at the end of our European road trip and I saw the local kids shopping, eating out and spending money. More than I used to do when I was their age. When you spend 8 hours under hot sun or in pouring rain to earn your money, you think twice where to spend it.
This is the new generation that wants it all, wants it easy. Don't know if it is the kids or the parents that have changed but I consider myself lucky having learned the abc's of financial responsibility that started in those strawberry farms with parents who showed me the real value of money.

I remember being a teenager and thinking "if I buy that, that's 4 hours work, do I want it that bad?" and I still do that today somewhat. I guess some people really love their jobs

eta: Kids these days! And their music!

Even a widely-known billionaire with bad hair said that whenever he saw a penny on the ground, he picked it up.  

larrymoencurly said:   Even a widely-known billionaire with bad hair said that whenever he saw a penny on the ground, he picked it up.  
  
Gates? Sam Walton? Buffett? George Lucas?

A seriously wealthy guy I knew kept used nails

ganda said:   I remember being a teenager and thinking "if I buy that, that's 4 hours work, do I want it that bad?" and I still do that today somewhat. I guess some people really love their jobs

eta: Kids these days! And their music!

  Some of my relatives:  "If I steal that, that's 4 hours work, do I want it that bad?"

ganda said:   
larrymoencurly said:   Even a widely-known billionaire with bad hair said that whenever he saw a penny on the ground, he picked it up.  
Gates? Sam Walton? Buffett? George Lucas?
A seriously wealthy guy I knew kept used nails

The billionaire who thinks his bad orange hair looks good.  He also once endorsed a check for something like 13¢, sent to him by a person who collected the autographs of celebrities that way.

The seriously wealthy guy who kept used nails was his father.
 

larrymoencurly said:   
ganda said:   
larrymoencurly said:   Even a widely-known billionaire with bad hair said that whenever he saw a penny on the ground, he picked it up.  
Gates? Sam Walton? Buffett? George Lucas?
A seriously wealthy guy I knew kept used nails

The billionaire who thinks his bad orange hair looks good. 
 

  
Conan? His settlement from NBC was that big?

yoshistatue said:   Maybe money is not that valuable when you just ask it from your parents.
Maybe money is not that valuable when you get it from the Government:

A few years ago, I saw a woman pay with food stamps at a grocery store, the cashier gave her back about 75 cts change.

She disdainfully threw back the coins on the belt: "I don't bother with that".

I cross the street to pick-up a penny.

larrymoencurly said:   
The billionaire who thinks his bad orange hair looks good.  
 

Carrot top?

mikebeets said:   
yoshistatue said:   Maybe money is not that valuable when you just ask it from your parents.
Maybe money is not that valuable when you get it from the Government:

A few years ago, I saw a woman pay with food stamps at a grocery store, the cashier gave her back about 75 cts change.

She disdainfully threw back the coins on the belt: "I don't bother with that".

I cross the street to pick-up a penny.

  
Food Stamps are provided with a SNAP card, you can't exchange it for cash, and you can't get change back - that's to prevent people from using it for non-food items. Cashiers have to enter the exact amount due, and then the transaction is approved. Any deviation and the transaction is denied. Many states use the SNAP card for TANF (welfare) or TCA (which you later usually have to pay back), and those people can use it like a debit card at any POS terminal to get cash. If she was using her TANF benefits to buy the food, still wouldn't have had change, unless she requested cash back at the POS terminal. And it would be really odd to ask for 75¢ over the transaction amount, especially if she didn't want it. The only way I can see this happening, is if she didn't have enough FS on her SNAP card, and she had to either use her TANF benefits, or pay cash. She may have been prompted by the POS terminal, that she didn't have sufficient FS to cover the transaction, at which point she could select cash, and manually enter a $ amount, which she might have rounded off to the nearest higher $ amount, instead of entering the exact total.

Since she entered over the amount of her TANF, it's a cashback, POS terminal would have approved it, and then cashier would have given her change. I suspect this might be what happened, it's the only scenario I can think of. MD was a test state for SNAP cards, when I lived there, I had an Independence Card (which is what the USDA called them back then in the early 90's) after an auto accident ended my ability to work. I had TCA and FS on the card, as MD provided both cash and food on the same card. So I have experience with this, as I received TCA for 6 months. The lady had to have had both FS and TANF, when she was prompted to enter the amount for TANF after the FS transaction was approved, she authorized cash which she applied to the remaining balance, leaving her with change. Considering she was dipping in her TANF for food, it's rather dumb to not bother with the change, unless she has assistance from various programs, and isn't needing to scrape by. 

SweetClover said:   mikebeets said:   
yoshistatue said:   Maybe money is not that valuable when you just ask it from your parents.
Maybe money is not that valuable when you get it from the Government:

A few years ago, I saw a woman pay with food stamps at a grocery store, the cashier gave her back about 75 cts change.

She disdainfully threw back the coins on the belt: "I don't bother with that".

I cross the street to pick-up a penny.

  
Food Stamps are provided with a SNAP card, you can't exchange it for cash, and you can't get change back - that's to prevent people from using it for non-food items. Cashiers have to enter the exact amount due, and then the transaction is approved. Any deviation and the transaction is denied. Many states use the SNAP card for TANF (welfare) or TCA (which you later usually have to pay back), and those people can use it like a debit card at any POS terminal to get cash. If she was using her TANF benefits to buy the food, still wouldn't have had change, unless she requested cash back at the POS terminal. And it would be really odd to ask for 75¢ over the transaction amount, especially if she didn't want it. The only way I can see this happening, is if she didn't have enough FS on her SNAP card, and she had to either use her TANF benefits, or pay cash. She may have been prompted by the POS terminal, that she didn't have sufficient FS to cover the transaction, at which point she could select cash, and manually enter a $ amount, which she might have rounded off to the nearest higher $ amount, instead of entering the exact total.

Since she entered over the amount of her TANF, it's a cashback, POS terminal would have approved it, and then cashier would have given her change. I suspect this might be what happened, it's the only scenario I can think of. MD was a test state for SNAP cards, when I lived there, I had an Independence Card (which is what the USDA called them back then in the early 90's) after an auto accident ended my ability to work. I had TCA and FS on the card, as MD provided both cash and food on the same card. So I have experience with this, as I received TCA for 6 months. The lady had to have had both FS and TANF, when she was prompted to enter the amount for TANF after the FS transaction was approved, she authorized cash which she applied to the remaining balance, leaving her with change. Considering she was dipping in her TANF for food, it's rather dumb to not bother with the channge, unless she has assistance from various programs, and isn't needing to scrape by. 


Have to go back in history before the program was changed and food stamps were given in stamps, denominated in whole dollars. Change was originally not given for food stamps, instead stores gave out essentially IOUs to people who used stamps and were due change. In 1977,congress authorized retailers to give cash change up to 99 cents. It remained that way until the move to EBT cards in the late 90s.

One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.

fasttimes said:   One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.
The exercise is worth it alone, even without the payday.

I would have pocketed the change left behind in both cases-no shame. Free money is free money, whether it's .01 or $1000. (Or 1000$, for those on here that insist on writing it this way).


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fasttimes said:   One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.
  
Sweet Radio Shoes Brah~

moonbeam said:
fasttimes said:   One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.
  And not worth the germs/disease on the street pennies. 😷

  
I totally misread that last word, and I would like to apologize for the shocked look on my face at what I thought you'd been doing.  

MVP9596 said:   fasttimes said:   One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.
  
Sweet Radio Shoes Brah~

Shoe phones are where it's at. Ask Agent Smart and 99.

ganda said:   
moonbeam said:
fasttimes said:   One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.
  And not worth the germs/disease on the street pennies. 😷

  
I totally misread that last word, and I would like to apologize for the shocked look on my face at what I thought you'd been doing.

  No, I was the only one stating I would NOT pick up nasty street trash. The rest of these fools were all for it.

fasttimes said:   One of those public radio shoes, I think it was planet money, said picking up pennies is financially not worth the effort.
  What if those pennies are one of the old expensive ones.

ganda said:   
larrymoencurly said:   
ganda said:   
larrymoencurly said:   Even a widely-known billionaire with bad hair said that whenever he saw a penny on the ground, he picked it up.  
Gates? Sam Walton? Buffett? George Lucas?
A seriously wealthy guy I knew kept used nails

The billionaire who thinks his bad orange hair looks good. 

  Conan? His settlement from NBC was that big?

  Fatter and less talented than Conan.  

Get off my lawn!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ganda said:   
larrymoencurly said:   Even a widely-known billionaire with bad hair said that whenever he saw a penny on the ground, he picked it up.  
  
Gates? Sam Walton? Buffett? George Lucas?

A seriously wealthy guy I knew kept used nails

Gates wouldn't pick up $45,000, as the theory goes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2inExgT77s





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