Slippery Linoluem Floor - What Can I Do To Make It Not Slippery?

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Please hold off on the snarky comments?   My elderly parents' kitchen linoleum floor is very slippery.   I am concerned for their safety.   Any suggestions on fixing this problem.  Thank you.

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WLABOB said:   Please hold off on the snarky comments?  

Wrong forum

Why is it so slippery? Maybe remove the wax? 

<<has dirty, sticky, non slippery kitchen floor 

Hello. I am OT's resident expert on slippery kitchen floors.  Please complete the following survey:

  1. Has the carpet in the adjoining room been treated or professionally cleaned lately?
  2. Is the slippyness localized or throughout the room?
  3. As MB suggests, have you tried thoroughly cleaning and/or stripping the floor?
  4. Did you ever get that question in science class about locomotion on a frictionless lake?

As for mitigation, if you can't solve the mystery you can put down some area rugs with double stick tape or invite MB and her cats over for a few weeks to see if that solves it.


I recommend a good waxing. You want to be able to see your reflection in that floor.

Glue sandpaper to the bottom of their footwear. If the floor is light color 400 grit should suffice, perhaps a 120 grit if it's dark or 1970's patterned.

I guess some of you missed
WLABOB said:   Please hold off on the snarky comments
  

If they moved everything out of the high shelves they could crawl on all fours. This won't work if their freezer is above their refrigerator. Or they could give up ice cream.

Practice safe falling in other parts of the house with softer floors?

Move all the kitchen stuff into a carpeted room

ganda said:   Practice safe falling in other parts of the house with softer floors?
  Layer the kitchen floor with bubble wrap.  Replace every Saturday afternoon to ensure a fresh layer of bubbles.

mapatsfan said:   
ganda said:   Practice safe falling in other parts of the house with softer floors?
  Layer the kitchen floor with bubble wrap.  Replace every Saturday afternoon to ensure a fresh layer of bubbles.

  
Pro: You could drop plates with impunity
Con: The bubbles would pop on high traffic routes

If this is a mobile home could you tip it so a fall in the kitchen would roll into a softer carpeted area for landing?

Definitely use wax designed for the specific type of floor. If you use wax that is supposed to be used for a counter top or dining room table, you'll end up killing yourself when walking on it.

ganda said:   If they moved everything out of the high shelves they could crawl on all fours. This won't work if their freezer is above their refrigerator. Or they could give up ice cream.Disagree.
Have a 12 month old who crawls on all fours and still slips. Probably has to do with her footie onesie material, but just saying.
I do recommend crawling in shorts or regular onesie though. Open knees create enough friction.

If it is truly linoleum, which may be pretty outdated flooring material, consider having a textured vinyl floor or cork installed to replace it. Depending on the size of the floor, etc. it really isn't very expensive to replace, in particular if the floor can be laid over the existing floor vs removal, then installation.

If there are slippery areas in the room they can use anti-stress mats that usually have beveled edges so people won't trip on them. like Gelpro for example.

On the other side of the issue (my mom is very elderly), your parents need to be mindful of what they are doing that may be unsafe. Shuffling around in slippers or in socks without grippers is not as safe as wearing soled-slippers or shoes and remembering to pick up one's feet when walking if it is physically possible. My mom took a balance class to learn how better to center herself. Also if they are frail and can get a doctor to approve PT for them, have the PT teach them how to fall to lessen the chance of injury. There are simple techniques to learn if they are open to learning. If they are under medical care, see if the doctor will recommend a visit by an OT to look for dangers in their home that can be mitigated to reduce the chance for accidents. 

ZenNUTS said:   https://www.amazon.com/Slippery-Vinyl-Wood-Floor-Spray/dp/B004ZERL4K
  I think that's a perfect post!

(I neither neither nor oppose nor guarantee the accuracy, timeliness or completeness of the information contained therein.)

 

atikovi said:   I guess some of you missed
WLABOB said:   Please hold off on the snarky comments
  

This is OT. Request denied.

scrouds said:   
atikovi said:   I guess some of you missed
WLABOB said:   Please hold off on the snarky comments
  

This is OT. Request denied.

  I tried to be helpful and snarky.  I'm harky!  
Snarkfully yours, I remain your own,
KKH

Rugs

snork
rugs in the kitchen give a whole new meaning to carpet munching

KayK said:   
ganda said:   If they moved everything out of the high shelves they could crawl on all fours. This won't work if their freezer is above their refrigerator. Or they could give up ice cream.
Disagree.
Have a 12 month old who crawls on all fours and still slips. Probably has to do with her footie onesie material, but just saying.
I do recommend crawling in shorts or regular onesie though. Open knees create enough friction.

  
My thinking was that if you slip while on all fours you don't have far to fall, so won't get hurt. Since OP's parents are on all fours perhaps they could wear saddlebags to transport food from the kitchen? They might have to stop eating soup.

Disappointed by the snarky/obnoxious responses.   Fatwalleters are usually knowledgeable and very helpful on these kind of matters.  

Spray silicone on the floor outside the kitchen. Then the kitchen won't be as challenging

WLABOB said:   Please hold off on the snarky comments?   My elderly parents' kitchen linoleum floor is very slippery.   I am concerned for their safety.   Any suggestions on fixing this problem.  Thank you.

My suggestion for fixing this problem would be to replace kitchen linoleum floor with linoleum kitchen floor, or less preferably, kitchen's linoleum floor.  You're welcome.

WLABOB said:   Disappointed by the snarky/obnoxious responses.   Fatwalleters are usually knowledgeable and very helpful on these kind of matters.  
  No true Scotsman would act thusly.  Harumph!

WLABOB said:   Disappointed by the snarky/obnoxious responses.   Fatwalleters are usually knowledgeable and very helpful on these kind of matters.  

Really? I never expected anything else from the posters in OT. I'm actually fairly surprised that the responses have been as tame as they have.

SecondGunman said:   
WLABOB said:   Disappointed by the snarky/obnoxious responses.   Fatwalleters are usually knowledgeable and very helpful on these kind of matters.  

Really? I never expected anything else from the posters in OT. I'm actually fairly surprised that the responses have been as tame as they have.

  
The floors in fasttimes's Mom's house are permanently slick with lube and bodily fluids, ask her how she keeps her very hefty footing and doesn't crash through to the basement dungeon of pain/joy.

Kandykornhead said:   
WLABOB said:   Disappointed by the snarky/obnoxious responses.   Fatwalleters are usually knowledgeable and very helpful on these kind of matters.  
  No true Scotsman would act thusly.  Harumph!

  
Nice fallacy


Lacie and stone-tile look vinyl
Disclaimer

Lacie and oak-finish vinyl plank
Disclaimer
WLABOB said:   Please hold off on the snarky comments?   My elderly parents' kitchen linoleum floor is very slippery.   I am concerned for their safety.   Any suggestions on fixing this problem.  Thank you.
  
Consider putting a new floor down. You don't even have to remove the linoleum, just put new flooring right on top. Since I am mobility impaired, and walk only short distances, a non-slip floor is essential for me. I dislike wall-to-wall carpeting which my old MD apartment had. So, when I bought my 1950 townhouse in DE, one of the things on my list was replacing/covering the floor. It's all the original 1950's linoleum in every room, but the bathroom (which has textured vinyl tile). It was a rental unit, that had wall-to-wall carpeting that was so beat up, the seller just removed it all prior to listing it.

The living room and hallways now have a rustic oak wood look vinyl plank flooring (Shaw LVT). It doesn't have a smooth, shiny look - instead, it has a a textured wood-grain look & feel, with a satin finish. The kitchen has a vinyl stone-tile look floor, that is a matte finish. The 'stone tiles' have a textured finish reminiscent of real stone, complete with molded grey 'grout'. The floor is by a European company, IVC, it has a 15 year warranty, and was easy for my contractor to install. If the kitchen is 12 x 12 or smaller (Mine is 12 x 11), you don't even need to attach it to the linoleum. If the linoleum is glued on a concrete slab (as my townhouse is), the linoleum acts as insulation from the cold concrete. A larger room needs either double-sided tape (designed for adhering sheet vinyl) along the edges, or an adhesive. IVC and Shaw both have an array of wood and stone look planks and sheet flooring that looks good, and comes in a wide variety of textures and finishes. I plan on using more wood-look vinyl flooring in the bedrooms (which still have the old linoleum in them).

Seriously, just redo the floor in the room. Both Shaw and IVC have affordable options that would work for your parents kitchen. If you keep an eye out for sales, you can pick up flooring for under a $1 a square foot ( I got the IVC at 50% off, 75 ˘ a square foot).


Also, kirbydog has some good advice, per PT & OT. An OT can also teach 'joint protection techniques', which is a different way of doing tasks, and making use of tools, devices, and changes on how you use your body, in order to protect your joints from excessive wear-and-tear and injury, due to arthritis or another problem.

Finally, OT is the home for snarkiness, You will get serious answers, but you will have snarky posts too.

moonbeam said:   Why is it so slippery? Maybe remove the wax? 

<<has dirty, sticky, non slippery kitchen floor 
 

  

What kind of floor do you have that is "dirty, sticky, non slippery" in your kitchen? I'm guessing something hard to clean due to age/wear & tear. 


My 1950's townhouse came complete with the old, original, linoleum. It's shot beyond any usability or saving. Scratched, dirty-looking, discolored - and it hasn't seen a wax job in a very long timer. It was buried under wall-to-wall carpeting  (the 1970's solution to 1950's linoleum, hide it under equally hideous shag carpeting, only to put low-pile in the 80's-90's), that was well-worn. The seller removed it before I bought it.

In spite of no wax, obvious scratching and ground-in dirt; that floor would send my 13 lb chunk of a Tuxedo cat into pirouettes and skids where she was literally sliding on tummy floof, when she would run and play. I had a few occasions where I nearly lost my footing as well, I felt like I had to walk as though there were glass shards underneath, to keep from slipping. It's worse, much worse, when wet. Now that the main quarters and kitchen have a non-slippery, textured, vinyl flooring (plank in LR & hall, stone-tile look in kitchen), I don't feel like I have to tread so carefully. While waxing linoleum makes it even slipperier, a dull, unwaxed, beat-up linoleum floor, still has some slipperiness to it.

Best solutions for OP, as mentioned by a few, is area rugs secured with double-sided tape, a BEVEL-edge floor mat (s), or simply covering/replacing the linoleum with a textured, no-shiny/slick, vinyl plank, tile or sheet flooring. Pick a floor that has a soft-sheen satin-finish, instead of a polished, shiny, finish. Textured wood, and/or stone-tile vinyl  have natural, non-polished, finishes.

You are absolutely correct, Sweet Clover. I like my apartment, but they haven't done any renovations in decades and it shows. My kitchen, bathroom and entry area have ancient, very worn tile floors that desperately need to be replaced. But it still wouldn't hurt for me to wash them more often.

I wish I had your new floors. They look fabulous. 

moonbeam said:   You are absolutely correct, Sweet Clover. I like my apartment, but they haven't done any renovations in decades and it shows. My kitchen, bathroom and entry area have ancient, very worn tile floors that desperately need to be replaced. But it still wouldn't hurt for me to wash them more often.

I wish I had your new floors. They look fabulous. 

  
Thanks! I love my floors! And I know that even if you kept on top of cleaning worn floors, they still won't look nice & clean.

Any chance your landlord might let you upgrade the flooring, with a reduction in your rent? My neighbors next door are renting their town home, their LL is the former owner of my house. LL still owns and rents 3 townhouses in this subdivision, down from the original 20 she & her husband bought back in the early 90's, and rented. Their house has the same hideous linoleum, and they asked the LL about that. Anyway, they made a deal with LL, and put all new flooring in the rooms, one-by-one, and the LL has given them a rent reduction to compensate their costs. My brother & SIL did something similar, with their rental unit. They remodeled the kitchen and upgraded flooring and fixtures, in exchange for a rent reduction. My brother did much of the work himself, LL reimbursed the cost of materials. If your LL would be amenable to you making changes like new flooring, choosing a type and style that your LL would allow, it could be a way to get them renovated.

You can get those flower things you put on the bottom of your bathtub & put on your floor.

SweetClover said:   
moonbeam said:   You are absolutely correct, Sweet Clover. I like my apartment, but they haven't done any renovations in decades and it shows. My kitchen, bathroom and entry area have ancient, very worn tile floors that desperately need to be replaced. But it still wouldn't hurt for me to wash them more often.

I wish I had your new floors. They look fabulous. 

  
Thanks! I love my floors! And I know that even if you kept on top of cleaning worn floors, they still won't look nice & clean.

Any chance your landlord might let you upgrade the flooring, with a reduction in your rent? My neighbors next door are renting their town home, their LL is the former owner of my house. LL still owns and rents 3 townhouses in this subdivision, down from the original 20 she & her husband bought back in the early 90's, and rented. Their house has the same hideous linoleum, and they asked the LL about that. Anyway, they made a deal with LL, and put all new flooring in the rooms, one-by-one, and the LL has given them a rent reduction to compensate their costs. My brother & SIL did something similar, with their rental unit. They remodeled the kitchen and upgraded flooring and fixtures, in exchange for a rent reduction. My brother did much of the work himself, LL reimbursed the cost of materials. If your LL would be amenable to you making changes like new flooring, choosing a type and style that your LL would allow, it could be a way to get them renovated.

  Ahhhh!!!! There is absolutely no way I would do that kind of work myself! It kinda defeats the whole purpose of renting.  

SweetClover said:   
moonbeam said:   You are absolutely correct, Sweet Clover. I like my apartment, but they haven't done any renovations in decades and it shows. My kitchen, bathroom and entry area have ancient, very worn tile floors that desperately need to be replaced. But it still wouldn't hurt for me to wash them more often.

I wish I had your new floors. They look fabulous. 

  
Thanks! I love my floors! And I know that even if you kept on top of cleaning worn floors, they still won't look nice & clean.

Any chance your landlord might let you upgrade the flooring, with a reduction in your rent? My neighbors next door are renting their town home, their LL is the former owner of my house. LL still owns and rents 3 townhouses in this subdivision, down from the original 20 she & her husband bought back in the early 90's, and rented. Their house has the same hideous linoleum, and they asked the LL about that. Anyway, they made a deal with LL, and put all new flooring in the rooms, one-by-one, and the LL has given them a rent reduction to compensate their costs. My brother & SIL did something similar, with their rental unit. They remodeled the kitchen and upgraded flooring and fixtures, in exchange for a rent reduction. My brother did much of the work himself, LL reimbursed the cost of materials. If your LL would be amenable to you making changes like new flooring, choosing a type and style that your LL would allow, it could be a way to get them renovated.

  Haha.. no. As the landlord, I choose the flooring and I'm sure as heck not just going to let someone's brother do it and then pay for their back injury. As a tenant that's dumb, you paid for a floor and you don't own it and the landlord kicks you out right after you finish.

moonbeam said:   
SweetClover said:   
moonbeam said:   You are absolutely correct, Sweet Clover. I like my apartment, but they haven't done any renovations in decades and it shows. My kitchen, bathroom and entry area have ancient, very worn tile floors that desperately need to be replaced. But it still wouldn't hurt for me to wash them more often.

I wish I had your new floors. They look fabulous. 

  
Thanks! I love my floors! And I know that even if you kept on top of cleaning worn floors, they still won't look nice & clean.

Any chance your landlord might let you upgrade the flooring, with a reduction in your rent? My neighbors next door are renting their town home, their LL is the former owner of my house. LL still owns and rents 3 townhouses in this subdivision, down from the original 20 she & her husband bought back in the early 90's, and rented. Their house has the same hideous linoleum, and they asked the LL about that. Anyway, they made a deal with LL, and put all new flooring in the rooms, one-by-one, and the LL has given them a rent reduction to compensate their costs. My brother & SIL did something similar, with their rental unit. They remodeled the kitchen and upgraded flooring and fixtures, in exchange for a rent reduction. My brother did much of the work himself, LL reimbursed the cost of materials. If your LL would be amenable to you making changes like new flooring, choosing a type and style that your LL would allow, it could be a way to get them renovated.

  Ahhhh!!!! There is absolutely no way I would do that kind of work myself! It kinda defeats the whole purpose of renting.  

  I have vinyl floor that is fugly, but not ruined yet. When I clean, I use the steam cleaner. The house cleaners use a wet mop with chemicals. Steam cleaner is just water. The floor is so clean with steam that it makes me housewife-proud. Hah!

So disappointed that there is no pre-paid hip replacement like there is pre-paid college. Some Drs are missing out on an easy moneymaker.

And they could go in as a joint venture with linoleum floor makers.

"Buy $2000 in linoleum flooring and we will give you $500 towards a pre-paid hip replacement! Act now before our Memorial Day Sale ends tomorrow!"



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