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rated:
but they're a bunch of crown vic lovin arses!
car insurance question: i want to let my cousin borrow my car for a few weeks while he is in town. at what point do i have to inform my insurance company? when i looked online, everyone , including insurance companies, note that policies follow the car and a borrower who has the owner's permission is covered. however, they don't specify a minimum or maximum duration for the simple loaning of cars. it was pretty clear that a day was covered but 2 weeks? or 4? 

besides, i'm one of those that believe that FWF should be limited to "deals" and bonuses, not a general question forum to all things that might money.

tia
m

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rated:
Don't mention it was weeks. Yeah, he borrowed my car today.

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scrouds said:   Don't mention it was weeks. Yeah, he borrowed my car today.
  that's the current strategy. sick minds think alike...

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A coworker's brother asked her and her husband to drive his vehicle to a place they were meeting.Along the way her husband was driving and caused an accident when he wasn't able to stop in time on the freeway where traffic had come to a full stop. The damages and medical coverage went against her brother's policy and his premium increased as a result.

I also did a bit of research because occasionally my guy will use my car and he does not have auto insurance (because he doesn't have a vehicle), which makes me nervous. Our situation is different than my coworkers because my guy is part of my household and is not an excluded driver on my policy.

 article 

 

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kirbydog said:   A coworker's brother asked her and her husband to drive his vehicle to a place they were meeting.Along the way her husband was driving and caused an accident when he wasn't able to stop in time on the freeway where traffic had come to a full stop. The damages and medical coverage went against her brother's policy and his premium increased as a result.

I also did a bit of research because occasionally my guy will use my car and he does not have auto insurance (because he doesn't have a vehicle), which makes me nervous. Our situation is different than my coworkers because my guy is part of my household and is not an excluded driver on my policy.

 article 

 

  cousin is from out of country and has no primary car insurance at all. and no, he is not a part of my household.
in your case, don't you have to add him to your policy?

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Should have bought him a Crown Vic to use, then sold it when he leaves.

/ Fwf

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If you really want to make sure you're covered, this would be a question for your insurance agent / company. Call the main office from a pay phone if you want to be paranoid.

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miserly said:   
kirbydog said:   A coworker's brother asked her and her husband to drive his vehicle to a place they were meeting.Along the way her husband was driving and caused an accident when he wasn't able to stop in time on the freeway where traffic had come to a full stop. The damages and medical coverage went against her brother's policy and his premium increased as a result.

I also did a bit of research because occasionally my guy will use my car and he does not have auto insurance (because he doesn't have a vehicle), which makes me nervous. Our situation is different than my coworkers because my guy is part of my household and is not an excluded driver on my policy.

 article 

 

  cousin is from out of country and has no primary car insurance at all. and no, he is not a part of my household.
in your case, don't you have to add him to your policy?

  I decided he didn't need to be added, because he is part of my household. He does have a current drivers license, of course.

If you are unsure, you could encourage the relative to rent a car with insurance coverage, in particular if you don't know whether or not they are good drivers. Or offer them your spiffy new bike?

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the spiffy new bike costs almost as much as the car i lent him.

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miserly said:   
kirbydog said:   A coworker's brother asked her and her husband to drive his vehicle to a place they were meeting.Along the way her husband was driving and caused an accident when he wasn't able to stop in time on the freeway where traffic had come to a full stop. The damages and medical coverage went against her brother's policy and his premium increased as a result.

I also did a bit of research because occasionally my guy will use my car and he does not have auto insurance (because he doesn't have a vehicle), which makes me nervous. Our situation is different than my coworkers because my guy is part of my household and is not an excluded driver on my policy.

 article 

 

  cousin is from out of country and has no primary car insurance at all. and no, he is not a part of my household.

 

  
Does he have a US driver's license? If not, I'll wager your insurance would be void if you tried to use it for something serious.

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If you have uninsured/underinsured coverage on your car, he's covered under that while driving your car for as long as.

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linrick said:   If you have uninsured/underinsured coverage on your car, he's covered under that while driving your car for as long as.
  
Are you sure about that? Wouldn't every parent of a teenager not bother adding their child to the insurance (jacking up the rates)?

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ganda said:   
linrick said:   If you have uninsured/underinsured coverage on your car, he's covered under that while driving your car for as long as.
  
Are you sure about that? Wouldn't every parent of a teenager not bother adding their child to the insurance (jacking up the rates)?

Yes, I'm 100% sure.  In regards to children, I don't know of any parents not adding their children on their policies once they
received their license.  It is too big of a financial risk not adding children to auto insurance policy.

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ganda said:   linrick said:   If you have uninsured/underinsured coverage on your car, he's covered under that while driving your car for as long as.
  
Are you sure about that? Wouldn't every parent of a teenager not bother adding their child to the insurance (jacking up the rates)?

They're a part of your household, so you'd have to exclude them or be not covered.

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You have an umbrella? Should further mitigate Amy risks I would think of someone comes after you.

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miserly said:   
ganda said:   
linrick said:   If you have uninsured/underinsured coverage on your car, he's covered under that while driving your car for as long as.
  
Are you sure about that? Wouldn't every parent of a teenager not bother adding their child to the insurance (jacking up the rates)?

They're a part of your household, so you'd have to exclude them or be not covered.

  Insurance in California
Nope, in California the uninsured/underinsured coverage if it is on your policy is for protection from accidents you are involved with with an uninsured/underinsured driver.

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kirbydog said:   
miserly said:   
ganda said:   
linrick said:   If you have uninsured/underinsured coverage on your car, he's covered under that while driving your car for as long as.
  
Are you sure about that? Wouldn't every parent of a teenager not bother adding their child to the insurance (jacking up the rates)?

They're a part of your household, so you'd have to exclude them or be not covered.

  Insurance in California 
Nope, in California the uninsured/underinsured coverage if it is on your policy is for protection from accidents you are involved with with an uninsured/underinsured driver.

  
Huh? Isn't that what I said?

Uninsured motorist coverage on YOUR policy is to protect YOU in case an uninsured moron hits you, it's not to cover random people who are driving YOUR car without being covered by YOUR policy when they ought to be.

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Ganda, sorry the posts are getting twisty. Linrick's response seemed to state that uninsured/underinsured coverage is for the policyholder who is underinsured or uninsured. This is not the case in California, which is where miserly resides, I think (pretty sure!) .

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i do live in CA. only a stones throw from kirby's. just to satisfy this thread, i'll call my insurance company later.

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so happy (58.89kB)
Disclaimer
I'm thinking Balki from Perfect Strangers

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According amerprise rep Linda, borrowing irregularly is covered under permissible use. Less than a month and irregular borrowing is covered without adding the driver. The less than a month seemed to be fuzzy but well beyond what I needed, so I did not press.

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Let me explain.  Uninsured/underinsured covered your liability; pip and collision on your car as well as other people if the person driving your car cause the accident regardless if that person is on your policy or not (hence the word Uninsured.)  Underinsured will kick in once your liability is over limit or the other person sues you.  It may be required in some states, but in TX, it's an option. 

If you make it a habit loaning your car to someone who's not on your policy and they get into an accident (their's or other's,) your insurance company might cancel or raise your rates or ask you to add that person for additional premium or whatever to your policy and you can either accept or not and shop for other insurance. But they still cover the people and ur car.

Now, children with license living under your household, insurance company knows anyway and will ask you to add or to exclude.  But majority of the people do add them to their policy to cover their butts because inexperience teenagers will likely to get into an accidents.  That's why it's expensive for teenagers to be covered in the auto policy.



 

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linrick said:   Let me explain.  Uninsured/underinsured covered your liability; pip and collision on your car as well as other people if the person driving your car cause the accident regardless if that person is on your policy or not (hence the word Uninsured.)  Underinsured will kick in once your liability is over limit or the other person sues you.  It may be required in some states, but in TX, it's an option. 

If you make it a habit loaning your car to someone who's not on your policy and they get into an accident (their's or other's,) your insurance company might cancel or raise your rates or ask you to add that person for additional premium or whatever to your policy and you can either accept or not and shop for other insurance. But they still cover the people and ur car.

Now, children with license living under your household, insurance company knows anyway and will ask you to add or to exclude.  But majority of the people do add them to their policy to cover their butts because inexperience teenagers will likely to get into an accidents.  That's why it's expensive for teenagers to be covered in the auto policy.



 

  Maybe that is the way it works in your state, but that is not the way it works in California as referenced previously.

rated:
Straight from AllState.

"Uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage may offer two types of protection: Bodily injury may help cover costs related to your injuries that result from a crash caused by an uninsured or underinsured driver. In some states this protection may extend to a family member who is driving your car, or your passengers."

rated:
linrick said:   Straight from AllState.

"Uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage may offer two types of protection: Bodily injury may help cover costs related to your injuries that result from a crash caused by an uninsured or underinsured driver. In some states this protection may extend to a family member who is driving your car, or your passengers."

Is the original question about liability coverage or bodily injury coverage? They are two different things.

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