Electric Water Heaters

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After 50+ years there has been little change in the design of the standard electric water heater. The water heater is the biggest waste of electric energy in my opinion. It's powered 24 hours a day so that you can have hot water when needed. In recent years, the manufacturers have added extra insulation which results in a few percent savings over the year. Big deal. The sacrificial anode rod will only last 5 to 10 years maximum and in most cases it's not worth replacing. Even though there's a glass inner tank, it does eventually fail and may leak all over your floor. I fail to understand why manufacturers don't integrate a built-in timer. We only need hot water when we shower, so why not shut off the heater the rest of the day. The remaining hot water will suffice for washing hands, etc. Why do they use glass-lined tanks instead of stainless ? Is it a cost factor only ? Do stainless tanks still require anode rods ? Where does the "sludge" in the bottom of the tank come from - the anode rod or the water ? After 24 years, we are on our third electric water heater. Each one has grown in width. Our average cost per unit was $600 including installation.

I looked into the hybrid heat-pump water heaters and they cost 2 to 3 times as much but don't seem to last any longer. Can they save energy if they only last 10 years ? 

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Rheem Marathon 50 Gal. Lifetime Warranty Electric Water Heater with Durable Design-MR50245 - The Home Depot
Disclaimer
After replacing a couple of water heaters, I ended up buying a Rheem Marathon

I bought mine in 2012 and paid <$700.

NoMoneyInMyWallet said:   After replacing a couple of water heaters, I ended up buying a Rheem Marathon

I bought mine in 2012 and paid <$700.

  It looks great until you start reading the 1-star reviews. It does not have a lifetime warranty according to those reviewers. And what about energy savings vs a standard water heater ?

Supposedly it would take more energy to heat colder water than just keep the water hot all the time. The same thing is said about air conditioning. Programmable thermostats are great but it's not like you can keep your house at 76 degrees while you are home and let the temperature go up to 85 while you are at work.

There are Tankless water heaters. But then your teenager would never run out of hot water and never get out of the shower.

The hybrid heater pulls heat from the ambient environment and only make sense if you lives in a warm climate. If the heater is well insulated then it's not "wasting" much energy. Remember, energy is going somewhere so even the waste is going into your house to warm it.

One reason that they are heated constantly is to reduce the growth of bacteria, such as the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' Disease.

blueribb said:   After 50+ years there has been little change in the design of the standard electric water heater. 
  Google "tankless water heater"

atikovi said:   
blueribb said:   After 50+ years there has been little change in the design of the standard electric water heater. 
  Google "tankless water heater"

  I looked into tankless electric water heaters and they require a huge amount of power to operate. My fuse box is filled to the max and would cost mega bux to upgrade. I'm pretty sure the 240 line feeding my current 50 gallon water heater isn't enough for a tankless unit

blueribb said:   atikovi said:   
blueribb said:   After 50+ years there has been little change in the design of the standard electric water heater. 
  Google "tankless water heater"

  I looked into tankless electric water heaters and they require a huge amount of power to operate. My fuse box is filled to the max and would cost mega bux to upgrade. I'm pretty sure the 240 line feeding my current 50 gallon water heater isn't enough for a tankless unit

How many amps on the breaker?

scrouds said:   
blueribb said:   
atikovi said:   
blueribb said:   After 50+ years there has been little change in the design of the standard electric water heater. 
  Google "tankless water heater"

  I looked into tankless electric water heaters and they require a huge amount of power to operate. My fuse box is filled to the max and would cost mega bux to upgrade. I'm pretty sure the 240 line feeding my current 50 gallon water heater isn't enough for a tankless unit

How many amps on the breaker?

  I have (2) 30 Amp Breakers feeding my current 50 gal electric. The EcoSmart 27 requires (3) 40 Amp Breakers. Also, tankless water heaters do not work well in cold climates where the incoming water temperature is just above freezing. I live in Pennsylvania, which is a cold climate. I would have to use a low-pressure shower head (< 2 GPM) to achieve a hot shower using a tankless unit.

I would just get a standard water heater in your situation. If you can though, convert to gas or propane.

Here's a helpful previous thread: Text

Yeah totally not worth it to convert.

I see you are well aware of the scam. You are required to be green, that requires larger, outside diameter tanks, for more insulation.

You said you want a timer. Why don't you just install one and tell us how it works.

If you want a dry run, trip the breaker manually and try it for a few days.

A quick Google search showed just the timer you need, https://www.1000bulbs.com/product/3397/ELEC-EH40.html, although I don't vouch for this particular model. Just need some wall space, and a little electrical work

If I had an amp clamp to use with my multimeter, I could measure the average energy usage for a 24 hour period. Then I would shut off the power to the water heater and only turn it back on for a 3 or 4 hour period (let's say 4 to 7 am) and measure the total energy used again. Then I would compare the numbers. I know the 3-hour period would require the heater to work harder to achieve the temperature setting but I don't know how much of a savings I would see.

I don't want to spend the money on a timer just yet

You can buy cheap clamp meter for about $30 on Amazon. However, measuring 220 in typical household is not easy as you need to pass both hot wire with one in the reverse direction in the loop.

I really doubt you will save that much with a timer but that's just a gut feeling. You will be much happier with a gas heater, however, much faster and cheaper in the long run.

energy use estimator by US state
This is interesting to try.

I live in Wisconsin and my tankless does just fine.  I can have a hot shower and be washing clothes/dishes at the same time with no issues.  It is natural gas though.


EnergyGuide Label
Disclaimer
Here's the EnergyGuide Sticker on my water heater. I locked my KWH Rate in at 7.5 cents a few years ago but I think that's only part of the total charge. Anyway, even at 12 cents per KWH, it's only $48 per month to run the water heater according to the label. Our neighborhood is all electric - there is no gas available unless you buy your own tank.

Can anyone here help me out. I have been looking into a tankless water heater for a while now and im not to convinced that it would be the right move. any tip or benefit besides saving space?

I am looking for latest electric water heater which consumes less power.

Hello everyone can anyone suggest me less power consumption electric heater.

aldendecker3 said:   Hello everyone can anyone suggest me less power consumption electric heater.
  Trump heater, it generates free energy.

ZenNUTS said:   aldendecker3 said:   Hello everyone can anyone suggest me less power consumption electric heater.
  Trump heater, it generates free energy.


Unlimited hot air, not free energy, get it right.



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