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twig (4.56MB)
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My flower bed has only these plants planted by the builder, I have no idea what plant it is. I'm attaching the pictures. First year it was very small but this year it grew much bigger like a wild bush. It looks ugly, but it survived very healthy through the winter, which is good because most of my other plants are dead. I live in Frisco, Texas, so, I'm guessing this is something native to Texas.
Thinking about removing them completely and plant something else. But would like to know what it is called.

- I couldn't upload more than 1 image
 

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Hard to tell from your pic, it has variegated leaves, you say it grew like a bush, I'm guessing it didn't flower. That looks like a trailing vine type of plant, going by the attached pic. The fact it survived winter, indicates some type of evergreen shrub. Could be a type of Ivy, a Buckthorn, a Dogwood Bush, or Wintercreeper. I'm strongly leaning towards a Dogwood Bush, leaves are very much like the Dogwood Bush, they aren't lobed, don't have toothed edges, and they do grow bushy as they mature. It's a common ornamental of European origin. If it is Dogwood Bush, it will grow to a sizeable bushy shrub, and will look wild, unkempt, if not cut back. Builder probably planted it to provide an inexpensive ornamental cover plant. It's rather nondescript, I wouldn't blame you from wanting to replace it with something more attractive.

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^^^ WTF?

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variegated ligurstrum, or possibly variegated euonymus...clue is Frisco Texas which is zone 8 and has alkaline soils... this winter was very mild in Texas...

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ZenNUTS said:   ^^^ WTF?
  Chinese spam....

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woowoo2 said:   
ZenNUTS said:   ^^^ WTF?
  Chinese spam....

  
Plant based Spam? I think I'll stick to the domestic pig kind.

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SweetClover said:   Hard to tell from your pic, it has variegated leaves, you say it grew like a bush, I'm guessing it didn't flower. That looks like a trailing vine type of plant, going by the attached pic. The fact it survived winter, indicates some type of evergreen shrub. Could be a type of Ivy, a Buckthorn, a Dogwood Bush, or Wintercreeper. I'm strongly leaning towards a Dogwood Bush, leaves are very much like the Dogwood Bush, they aren't lobed, don't have toothed edges, and they do grow bushy as they mature. It's a common ornamental of European origin. If it is Dogwood Bush, it will grow to a sizeable bushy shrub, and will look wild, unkempt, if not cut back. Builder probably planted it to provide an inexpensive ornamental cover plant. It's rather nondescript, I wouldn't blame you from wanting to replace it with something more attractive.
Kkh, you have a challenger for OT's resident expert on plants.

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cia said:   variegated ligurstrum, or possibly variegated euonymus...clue is Frisco Texas which is zone 8 and has alkaline soils... this winter was very mild in Texas...
  
Euonymus is Wintercreeper, wasn't sure if it grew as far South as Texas, that's a good possibility. I leaned towards the Dogwood Bush because it's native all over Europe, was brought by Europeans to the US, and grows in all kinds of climates with ease. Had to look up ligurstrum, called 'Chinese Privet', but that one flowers, and OP didn't mention seeing white flowers in the Summer. Wintercreeper/euonymus is a good fit.
kamalktk said: Kkh, you have a challenger for OT's resident expert on plants.


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The bushy plant is called Silver Queen

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Cannabis. It looks like the good stuff.

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It's a plant.

/this is what happens when you grow up in Los Angeles.

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gangt said:   what plant is this?
  Don't you mean, what plant WAS this?

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linrick said:   The bushy plant is called Silver Queen
  
That is a variety of Wiintercreeper/variegated euonymus (that cia mentioined). But after seeing your link, I do not believe the OP's plant is a Wintercreeper, because your image shows toothed edges on the leaves, which OP's picture does not. So, I'm going to stick with my suggestion that it is the European Dogwood Bush. Dogwood Bush's don't have the serrated tooth-like edges. They are smooth like the OP's pic. Dogwood Bush's are so commonly planted all over the US, and grow very quickly (OP noted a small plant that grew quickly into a wild-looking bush, classic characteristic of Dogwood's), to the point that in many areas they are considered an invasive species, crowding out local vegetation. And they are cheap to buy, and are used to quickly cover bare areas, due to their rapid growth.

I think the OP should replace them with something else that they like, why keep something that they consider ugly? Plus, unless you constantly cut it back, it will get wilder and eventually take over the garden in a season or two. Easier to rip 'em out when young. Buy something the OP finds attractive, and plant that instead. Look up native species suitable for a Texas climate. Or just go to a nursery, and look at what they have. It's your home/garden, personalize it to your satisfaction.

My townhouse had no garden, when I bought it in 7/2015. Paid a landscaper to come in and create a bed out front, and plant a few things in it. Last Spring I had 5 bare-root roses grow into small bushes and flower until hard frost in the Fall (My $10 for all 5 from Brecks clearance sale) Neighborhood handyman planted bulbs, tubers & bare root perennials for me last fall. I have crocuses and hyacinths already in bloom (Started Thursday). I can't wait for the daffodils, iris's & lillies.

OP, plant something you'll love in your garden, flowers or ornamental shrubs, or a mix of both. Something you can look forward to seeing grow during Spring, Summer & Fall, Texas climate should allow some year-round varieties of plants as well, your Winters are mild.

burgerwars said: Cannabis. It looks like the good stuff.


Were you stoned when you posted this, ganja must've been good. Not only are members of the hemp/cannabis family known for their distinctly saw-toothed serrated edges, I've never seen a variegated cannabis.

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I would agree with you but, the soil down here and the heat would do in a "dogwood bush" we have really alkaline soils, we add peat moss to buffer the soils and have to have pure peat moss to grow azaleas so dogwoods are a costly mistake that a contractor wouldn't go for. Also you can't find "dogwood bushes" in the Dallas metro area...maybe east Texas but not here. It looks to me like a "silver Queen, cheaply available at the local box stores and pretty much what the housing contractors look for in the area.

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SweetClover said:   
linrick said:   The bushy plant is called Silver Queen
  
That is a variety of Wiintercreeper/variegated euonymus (that cia mentioined). But after seeing your link, I do not believe the OP's plant is a Wintercreeper, because your image shows toothed edges on the leaves, which OP's picture does not. So, I'm going to stick with my suggestion that it is the European Dogwood Bush. Dogwood Bush's don't have the serrated tooth-like edges. They are smooth like the OP's pic. Dogwood Bush's are so commonly planted all over the US, and grow very quickly (OP noted a small plant that grew quickly into a wild-looking bush, classic characteristic of Dogwood's), to the point that in many areas they are considered an invasive species, crowding out local vegetation. And they are cheap to buy, and are used to quickly cover bare areas, due to their rapid growth.

I think the OP should replace them with something else that they like, why keep something that they consider ugly? Plus, unless you constantly cut it back, it will get wilder and eventually take over the garden in a season or two. Easier to rip 'em out when young. Buy something the OP finds attractive, and plant that instead. Look up native species suitable for a Texas climate. Or just go to a nursery, and look at what they have. It's your home/garden, personalize it to your satisfaction.

My townhouse had no garden, when I bought it in 7/2015. Paid a landscaper to come in and create a bed out front, and plant a few things in it. Last Spring I had 5 bare-root roses grow into small bushes and flower until hard frost in the Fall (My $10 for all 5 from Brecks clearance sale) Neighborhood handyman planted bulbs, tubers & bare root perennials for me last fall. I have crocuses and hyacinths already in bloom (Started Thursday). I can't wait for the daffodils, iris's & lillies.

OP, plant something you'll love in your garden, flowers or ornamental shrubs, or a mix of both. Something you can look forward to seeing grow during Spring, Summer & Fall, Texas climate should allow some year-round varieties of plants as well, your Winters are mild.

burgerwars said: Cannabis. It looks like the good stuff.


Were you stoned when you posted this, ganja must've been good. Not only are members of the hemp/cannabis family known for their distinctly saw-toothed serrated edges, I've never seen a variegated cannabis.
 

I'm from the Dallas Fort Worth areas too and believe me, that plant is the Silver Queen plant and Op's twig is at the matured stage. 

 

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^^^Whatever it is, Wintercreeper or Dogwood Bush, I think there is agreement that both plants are cheap ornamentals that grow rapidly, display invasive behavior, and take over a garden quickly. If you want to fill in empty space in a season or two, both would do the job. Regardless of what it might be, it's a rather common, and somewhat unattractive, bushy plant. If OP hates it, it may not really matter - just get rid of it. OP might even see the exact plant at the local nursery/garden center, while looking for something more attractive to replace it with.

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cia said:   variegated ligurstrum, or possibly variegated euonymus...clue is Frisco Texas which is zone 8 and has alkaline soils... this winter was very mild in Texas...
  I guess it's varigated Ligustrum. When I did google image search on all the plant names from this thread, this varigated Ligustrum matches very well to mine.

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