Anyone here eat basmati rice practically everyday?

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Hubby's diagnosed with diabetes so I need to cut out regular jasmine rice from his diet.   But he's a daily rice eater so a friend suggested basmati rice because of its low glycemic index.  She also cook it with her expensive electric pressure cooker and hers came out soft and chewy like regular jasmine rice.  I have a regular rice cooker with different rice settings but doesn't matter which setting and water adjustments, the basmatic rice never came out soft and chewy like my friend's.

Anyone with cooking basmati rice experience can give me tips other than invest in a electric pressure cooker?

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If you are going to eat basmati rice for diabetes management, it needs to be whole grain. Otherwise, it's best not to eat it daily, and not too much.

Every rice has it's own "way" of getting cooked. The grains of the Basmati are supposed be separate and a little hard when fully cooked. Otherwise, it's like buying prime steak, and then making ground meat out of it.
Since you need the recipe for medicinal purposes rather than culinary ones, know that the more intact the structure of a grain of rice, the lower the GI because once consumed the particle size maintains intact for longer, slowing the digestive process.
In other words, learn to enjoy rice a different way than you are accustomed to.


Thanks Ocean.  Most suggested soaking the rice 30 minutes b4 cooking.  I haven't tried that because I thought that since basmati is a dry rice, it will crumble/break if soaked.

 

Buy at SamsClub (not Costco), or at an Indian grocery store. The larger the bag, the lower the unit price.
Zebra, Royal, 817, Elephant, Pari, Tilda...

You can try other brands as well. Look for sales at the Indian store. Patel Brothers or Sabzi Mandi if you have those around you.
Royal at Sam's is a great value.

Low carb. Skip the rice. Over time you can reverse diabetes. If you want to know more let me know.

scrouds said:   Low carb. Skip the rice. Over time you can reverse diabetes. If you want to know more let me know.
 

  Whole grain Basmati does not need to be skipped.

ocean935 said:   scrouds said:   Low carb. Skip the rice. Over time you can reverse diabetes. If you want to know more let me know.
 

  Whole grain Basmati does not need to be skipped.

Of course not. If you want to accept the slow steady decline of advancing diabetes, eat whatever you want.

But if you want real improvement, don't buy into the low glycemic index myth.

Even though I'm Indian.. I only eat rice like once every 10 days or so.

Tsuru Mai brown rice is an option. Some people I know who have moved from white to brown rice have done it gradually by mixing half and half white and brown. I don't think they cook at the same time, but there is a Japanese rice called haiga which is a mix of both. 
I bought a bag of "premium" Zebra brand rice from a local Indian market and it had a distinctly chemical flavor and odor that was very unappealing. I'm using the dry rice as filler for microwave hot packs, which is a really expensive filler. But otherwise I would have thrown it out so that is that.
To answer the topic question - I eat rice a couple of times per month. I prefer short grain, but my guy doesn't like sticky Japanese rice so I make long grain rice instead, which is usually jasmine. We also have basmati or arborio occasionally. I have a standard Japanese rice cooker but I cook rice on the stove because it's easier for me and it's way easier to clean the pot. I like wild rice, but he won't eat it at all.

ocean935 said:   Buy at SamsClub (not Costco), or at an Indian grocery store. The larger the bag, the lower the unit price.
Zebra, Royal, 817, Elephant, Pari, Tilda...

You can try other brands as well. Look for sales at the Indian store. Patel Brothers or Sabzi Mandi if you have those around you.
Royal at Sam's is a great value.

I bought the organic Royal Sona Masoori rice at Costco thinking it was organic basmati.  Opened the bag and the rice grains were so tiny, I thought they were broken rice.  Cooked a batch and it didn't taste good.  Finding out it was high in glycemic index as jasmine white rice.  Then I returned that bag and looked for the Royal brand of basmati.  Costco didn't have the Royal brand so I settled for the 20lbs bag of Zafarini brand.   Had no idea the Brand of basmati makes a difference.  I will buy the Royal at Sams soon.
 

KayK said:   Even though I'm Indian.. I only eat rice like once every 10 days or so.

This calls for revocation of your Indian card. I mean how can you live without rice for over a week? SMH.

Don't Chinese and Japanese eat more rice than Indians?

KayK said:   Even though I'm Indian.. I only eat rice like once every 10 days or so.
Looks like you only eat once every 10 days or so.

kirbydog said:   I bought a bag of "premium" Zebra brand rice from a local Indian market and it had a distinctly chemical flavor and odor that was very unappealing.
 

Not all Indian stores take proper care of their merchandise. Your bag likely got exposed/contaminated at the store level. Should have returned it with "extreme prejudice".

linrick said:   Costco didn't have the Royal brand so I settled for the 20lbs bag of Zafarini brand.   Had no idea the Brand of basmati makes a difference.  I will buy the Royal at Sams soon.
 

20 lb bag of Royal basmati at Costco: $29.99.
Same at Sam's: $16.48.

How? Why? I dunno!

As for the brand making a difference, it's the same as any other food item, including Jasmine rice, green tea, coffee, and so forth.

ach1199 said:   
KayK said:   Even though I'm Indian.. I only eat rice like once every 10 days or so.

This calls for revocation of your Indian card. I mean how can you live without rice for over a week? SMH.

Northern and Western Indians generally eat rice as a "special Dish", and it typically tends to be dry and rich.
Southern and Eastern Indians generally eat rice as a staple, and it typically tends to be damp and plain.

atikovi said:   Don't Chinese and Japanese eat more rice than Indians?
Going East, once you hit Eastern India, all the way to Japan, the locals eat rice as a staple. So the consumption per capita is similar in Eastern India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Korea, and Japan.
Throw in Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and Taiwan, and there you have it.

ocean935 said:   
linrick said:   Costco didn't have the Royal brand so I settled for the 20lbs bag of Zafarini brand.   Had no idea the Brand of basmati makes a difference.  I will buy the Royal at Sams soon.
20 lb bag of Royal basmati at Costco: $29.99.
Same at Sam's: $16.48.

How? Why? I dunno!

As for the brand making a difference, it's the same as any other food item, including Jasmine rice, green tea, coffee, and so forth.
 


  The price at Costc0's in Chicago area is $17.

 

Try quinoa

BrianGa said:   Try quinoa
 Like quinoa but can't eat it everyday.  It's definitely something to get used to tho.
ocean935 said:   
linrick said:   Costco didn't have the Royal brand so I settled for the 20lbs bag of Zafarini brand.   Had no idea the Brand of basmati makes a difference.  I will buy the Royal at Sams soon.
20 lb bag of Royal basmati at Costco: $29.99.
Same at Sam's: $16.48.

How? Why? I dunno!

As for the brand making a difference, it's the same as any other food item, including Jasmine rice, green tea, coffee, and so forth.

That's Costco's online price for the Royal basmati you see there.  Some Costco warehouses carry the Royal's 20lbs bag for $15 and mine don't.  The Zafarini brand one cost me $15 for a 20lbs bag too.   Haven't shop at Sams for a long time so don't know how much locally.  Will take advantage of the Sam's membership deal and check out local Sams soon.
 

ocean935 said:   
atikovi said:   Don't Chinese and Japanese eat more rice than Indians?
Going East, once you hit Eastern India, all the way to Japan, the locals eat rice as a staple. So the consumption per capita is similar in Eastern India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Korea, and Japan.
Throw in Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and Taiwan, and there you have it.

 All these countries including India eat rice daily and practically withe every breakfast, lunch & dinner.  Our eating rice is equals to American's daily bread/rolls.

ocean935 said:   
kirbydog said:   I bought a bag of "premium" Zebra brand rice from a local Indian market and it had a distinctly chemical flavor and odor that was very unappealing.
Not all Indian stores take proper care of their merchandise. Your bag likely got exposed/contaminated at the store level. Should have returned it with "extreme prejudice".
 

There are a few Indian/Pakistani grocery stores near me.  But their stores are not well kept or stocked so I don't go there for anything but getting a few spices & goat meat to make curry dishes.

ocean935 said:   
kirbydog said:   I bought a bag of "premium" Zebra brand rice from a local Indian market and it had a distinctly chemical flavor and odor that was very unappealing.
Not all Indian stores take proper care of their merchandise. Your bag likely got exposed/contaminated at the store level. Should have returned it with "extreme prejudice".

  It was ok for the first couple of times, then was bad. I think it was probably old inventory. The store we bought it from doesn't take merchandise back even though the owner knows that I'm a regular customer so I didn't bother.

For basmati, old inventory (or aged) is actually preferable.

Interesting. For Japanese rice, the new harvest is preferable, or I guess that's why the markets put up signs to announce it?

ocean935 said:   ach1199 said:   
KayK said:   Even though I'm Indian.. I only eat rice like once every 10 days or so.

This calls for revocation of your Indian card. I mean how can you live without rice for over a week? SMH.

Northern and Western Indians generally eat rice as a "special Dish", and it typically tends to be dry and rich.
Southern and Eastern Indians generally eat rice as a staple, and it typically tends to be damp and plain.
I'm from West (Gujarat state) and we dont like it dry for the most part. We eat it with daal (spiced lentil soup)

kirbydog said:   Interesting. For Japanese rice, the new harvest is preferable, or I guess that's why the markets put up signs to announce it?
Same thing with Vietnamese.  New crop is much preferred and old stock (very dry) normally marked down a few $ cheaper. 

ocean935 said:   For basmati, old inventory (or aged) is actually preferable.
  Maybe freshly harvested ones are softer/stickier consistent cooked?  If that's the case, I would preferred new stock then.


Uncle Bens Basmati
Disclaimer
My wife eats the Uncle Ben's Basmati READY RICE and really likes it.  8.5 oz bag and cooks in 90 seconds in the microwave
so it is easy to make.  Not cheap to buy it this way but she does not have it every day.  Me, I am a traditional regular white rice
fan as I don't go in for these designer rice things.
 

Ready rice is the worst that one can have, on so many levels. Lack of flavor, harmfulness to health, pricier, ...

KayK said:   
 
I'm from West (Gujarat state) and we dont like it dry for the most part. We eat it with daal (spiced lentil soup)

The daal is wet/damp/runny, the rice is dry(ish).

Don't cut of any food items immediately. Just start having some regular exercises and then slowly cut down by less quality. and the stop after some time and make your exercise and other healthy diets regular in proper quantity...

scrouds said:   Low carb. Skip the rice. Over time you can reverse diabetes. If you want to know more let me know.
  You can't reverse diabetes, especially type 1, but you can usually prevent or manage type 2 through medication and weight control.  

linrick said:   
 All these countries including India eat rice daily and practically withe every breakfast, lunch & dinner.  Our eating rice is equals to American's daily bread/rolls.

  Yet most of their residents look so thin from eating something so loaded with carbs. Is this the Indian paradox?

atikovi said:   
linrick said:   
 All these countries including India eat rice daily and practically withe every breakfast, lunch & dinner.  Our eating rice is equals to American's daily bread/rolls.

  Yet most of their residents look so thin from eating something so loaded with carbs. Is this the Indian paradox?

  
They prob don't get the luxury of eating unlimited food like in America and throwing half of it away.

davef139 said:   
atikovi said:   
linrick said:   
 All these countries including India eat rice daily and practically withe every breakfast, lunch & dinner.  Our eating rice is equals to American's daily bread/rolls.

  Yet most of their residents look so thin from eating something so loaded with carbs. Is this the Indian paradox?

  
They prob don't get the luxury of eating unlimited food like in America and throwing half of it away.

Not unlimited food but meat and dairy are a luxury in most of those countries.   Also, walking is a way of life there too.



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