Windows 7 Purchase

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I need a new Windows 7 license.  All of my copies are in use and I'm putting a machine together for my mother-in-law.  She has only ever used XP up to this point, I think she would do fine with 7 but pretty sure she'd need a lot of hand-holding to use 8 or 10.

So I searched Google Shopping for Windows 7 and am surprised to see so many low prices.

Here's an example from Licentie4U.  Google Shopping shows 4.5 star seller review with over 700 reviews so that would seem good enough to me.  Looks like it's Professional version to boot.

I see a $19 alternative from dealscube, 4.5 stars, almost 200 reviews.

I guess I've always been under the impression that Windows retail versions were $100+...  Are these sites legit?

My one and only concern is that I receive a key that is genuine and won't result in problems with activation or licensing.

Your thoughts?

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Most of these sites are selling you either

1) Stolen Keys
2) Fraudulent Keys that are created with a key generator
3) Copies of Windows Disks that are changed to not call microsoft.
4) An insider at M$ sold the keys and hid it from Corporate.

These keys will activate, but they were most likely obtained using dubious methods.

A few things to keep in mind.
1) MS stopped selling Windows 7 quite a while back. The chances of getting a legit license are slim to none.
2) Windows OEM licenses are not supposed to be used on machines that you are building for yourself. They are for resale only. For a self built machine that you are not selling you need a full retail license.
3) Windows 10 Pro OEM includes downgrade rights to 7 Pro.

If you really want to be 100% legit you should buy a 10 Pro OEM license. Sell the PC to your MiL for $1. This lets you install 7 Pro for her with no issues. Of course, if you are going to buy 10 you should probably just install 10 anyway. If you are really worried about hand holding you can install Classic Shell for her.

Some thoughts --

If you have a number of copies of Win 7, but they are all in use,
and if the MIL really needs Win 7,
yet what's available for sale in terms of standalone licences is probably quite dodgy these days (which it really sounds like),
if you are comfortable with more recent operating systems (which obviously you are), then maybe you could do a switch and give her one of your existing copies of 7, and buy yourself a copy of 8 or 10 to put on the machine you decide to take the Win 7 off of (either a computer of yours, or a computer that someone to whom you previously loaned one of your Win 7 copies is using -- someone who you think would be able to get the hang of 8 or 10 without a lot of tutoring by you.)

Or, if you want a new, official licence for win 7, you could buy one of the remaining new computers that still comes with it. There are some win 7 laptops out there which are not too expensive. Either straight Win 7, or a higher OS and downgradable to Win 7. Look in the "business" section of the manufacturer's store websites for these. Microsoft has given manufacturers a deadline of October 2016, I think, to stop producing win7 models. After that deadline, however, retailers will still be allowed to sell their remaining stock of originally-win7 computers until those are sold out.

Apparently, the patching/Windows Update process for Win 7 will be really different (moving to cumulative, inclusive, multi-patch giant Rollups, similar to what Win 10 has) after October's Patch Tuesday, according to Microsoft,
so based on how you think you are going to like that new system and how it's going to affect the way you configure a "new" Win 7 computer for someone, you might want to get her machine all put together before then, or wait until after then.

oppidum said:   Some thoughts --

If you have a number of copies of Win 7, but they are all in use,
and if the MIL really needs Win 7,
yet what's available for sale in terms of standalone licences is probably quite dodgy these days (which it really sounds like),
if you are comfortable with more recent operating systems (which obviously you are), then maybe you could do a switch and give her one of your existing copies of 7, and buy yourself a copy of 8 or 10 to put on the machine you decide to take the Win 7 off of (either a computer of yours, or a computer that someone to whom you previously loaned one of your Win 7 copies is using -- someone who you think would be able to get the hang of 8 or 10 without a lot of tutoring by you.)

Or, if you want a new, official licence for win 7, you could buy one of the remaining new computers that still comes with it.
 

  If you are trying to stay legit, you can't do any of that.  PCs that come with Windows installed have OEM licenses and those live and die on that PC.  They cannot be moved.

You can get the Windows 7 UI free here:
http://www.classicshell.net/

Thanks, everyone.  I ended up using an unused license a friend had.

Windows 7 Pro is activated and installing the ~250 important updates now...

minidrag said:   
oppidum said:   If you have a number of copies of Win 7, but they are all in use,
and if the MIL really needs Win 7,
yet what's available for sale in terms of standalone licences is probably quite dodgy these days (which it really sounds like),
if you are comfortable with more recent operating systems (which obviously you are), then maybe you could do a switch and give her one of your existing copies of 7, and buy yourself a copy of 8 or 10 to put on the machine you decide to take the Win 7 off of (either a computer of yours, or a computer that someone to whom you previously loaned one of your Win 7 copies is using -- someone who you think would be able to get the hang of 8 or 10 without a lot of tutoring by you.)

Or, if you want a new, official licence for win 7, you could buy one of the remaining new computers that still comes with it.

  If you are trying to stay legit, you can't do any of that.  PCs that come with Windows installed have OEM licenses and those live and die on that PC.  They cannot be moved.


1. Buying the mother-in-law a new computer with windows 7 on it is legitimate.

2. Buying a portable retail, above-board copy of Win 8 or Win 10, sans computer, is legitimate (if they still sell those operating systems separate from a computer -- which they do, right?)

So how is what I suggested not legitimate?

(The OP said that he has licences of Windows 7 that he can move around, and machines that he can move them around on, so those licences are presumably not legally tied to particular computers.  The OP did not say that it would be illegal for him to move one of the Win 7 licences that he already has in use and that's why he can't do that, he just said that he has a few but none are free for him to put on this newly-built machine, so my assumption was that if he did have one free, then he would installed it on this new machine, and that's why I said maybe he could put a perfectly legal copy of 8 or 10 on one of those machines, and take the 7 off of there to give to his MIL.  The onus was already on the OP for the legitimacy of that step.)

oppidum said:   
minidrag said:   
oppidum said:   If you have a number of copies of Win 7, but they are all in use,
and if the MIL really needs Win 7,
yet what's available for sale in terms of standalone licences is probably quite dodgy these days (which it really sounds like),
if you are comfortable with more recent operating systems (which obviously you are), then maybe you could do a switch and give her one of your existing copies of 7, and buy yourself a copy of 8 or 10 to put on the machine you decide to take the Win 7 off of (either a computer of yours, or a computer that someone to whom you previously loaned one of your Win 7 copies is using -- someone who you think would be able to get the hang of 8 or 10 without a lot of tutoring by you.)

Or, if you want a new, official licence for win 7, you could buy one of the remaining new computers that still comes with it.
 

  If you are trying to stay legit, you can't do any of that.  PCs that come with Windows installed have OEM licenses and those live and die on that PC.  They cannot be moved.


1. Buying the mother-in-law a new computer with windows 7 on it is legitimate.

2. Buying a portable retail, above-board copy of Win 8 or Win 10, sans computer, is legitimate (if they still sell those operating systems separate from a computer -- which they do, right?)

So how is what I suggested not legitimate?

(The OP said that he has licences of Windows 7 that he can move around, and machines that he can move them around on, so those licences are presumably not legally tied to particular computers.  The OP did not say that it would be illegal for him to move one of the Win 7 licences that he already has in use and that's why he can't do that, he just said that he has a few but none are free for him to put on this newly-built machine, so my assumption was that if he did have one free, then he would installed it on this new machine, and that's why I said maybe he could put a perfectly legal copy of 8 or 10 on one of those machines, and take the 7 off of there to give to his MIL.  The onus was already on the OP for the legitimacy of that step.)

  1) I completely missed your last sentence, where you said that.  Yes, buying a new PC with 7 would be fine.
2) Sure you can buy a retail copy of the OS.  If you said it in your post I missed it the first time and I'm still not seeing it.

  The implication I got from your post was that OP should move a license from another PC.  I was not assuming OP had retail licenses because very few people do.  Most people just move OEM licenses around because they don't know that's not allowed by the license.  You are correct that it's completely up to OP to do the right thing.



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