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Looking for an explanation of what ips and ids protection are, in relation to VPNs

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While browsing the internet, i came across an ad of a vpn that was offering something called ips and ids protection. I dont understand what ips and ids really mean and what their purpose is. Can someone please explain these two things to me. I dont really know much about this kind of stuff

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This might help to give you a basic understanding.

http://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Computer_Science/intrusion_d...

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I understand it a little now. thanks for the link. Would something like this cause my connection to lose speed?

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JackHarkness said:   I understand it a little. Would something like this cause my connection to lose speed?
  Both of these acronyms are about defending your systems from attacks. One is like a guard tower with a spot light and a siren and the other is an active defense that attempts to counteract the intrusion directly by. I guess they could slow your system down if you had them active and in general if you were using a VPN they can be slow depending on how it is run and how far you are from it.

There are so many possible reasons for your connection being slow that jumping to the conclusion of an attack is way down the list. 

Most of the time it is that your modem or router is losing functionality with age. Those two items are the first place to check. If you can get a second of each to test this it would be the best first step. Try your router first it is usually the culprit. 

Also is there any pattern to the slow down. Is it consistent (every task)? Is it constant (all day)? Are there any exceptions to the slowness?  

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JackHarkness, you would get more people looking at your threads, and probably more people commenting on them with thoughts and advice, if you worded the thread titles in such a way as to clearly explain what your question is about.

For example, a more specific thread title for this thread might be:
"Looking for an explanation of what ips and ids protection are, in relation to VPNs"

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thank you. Gonna take your advice and repost the thread for more explainations

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JackHarkness said:   thank you. Gonna take your advice and repost the thread for more explainations
You may not get many more responses to this particular question because the Fatwallet Technology forum is not visited by many people,
and there probably isn't much that most readers here could add to the advice that you've already been given above.

If you need further advice, you may have better luck asking in user forums that are on dedicated technology/computing websites.

However, it's a good practice in general to make thread titles specific and descriptive,
and good for you for keeping a close eye on your thread and adopting the suggested improvement. 

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JackHarkness said:   I understand it a little now. thanks for the link. Would something like this cause my connection to lose speed?
  
If an IDS and IPS are built to handle the load of your broadband connection, they shouldn't significantly affect your speed. Keep in mind that there's two basic measures of "speed" on an internet connection: the bandwidth and the latency. The bandwidth is what ISPs mainly advertise, and it's how much data you can get at once. Latency is trickier, and it's basically how fast of a response you can get. From what I've read, an IPS can affect latency, but this should be minor unless the IPS can't handle the load.

A VPN itself is going to affect both bandwidth and latency. It affects bandwidth due to adding the "overhead" of encrypting the data being sent and received, basically reducing the amount of bandwidth available for the data inside the encrypted stream. It also adds latency since, instead of your internet connection going from your PC to the website/service you're connecting to in as direct path as possible, the connection goes from your PC to the VPN servers, and then to website. Since the path is likely longer, the latency is higher. Good VPN services may have server locations all over the US geographically to reduce this latency, since you'll connect to the one closest to you, instead of possibly going across the continent and back to connect to a given website.

More info on IPS and IDS:
https://www.garlandtechnology.com/blog/ids-vs-ips-its-more-than-...
https://www.getadvanced.net/pdfs/Network-Security-IPS-vs-IDS.pdf

 

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Honestly, unless they provide a WHOLE lot more detail you have no idea what they are doing. In general, people use those terms incorrectly all the time. VPN's are the hot thing as of late, so many companies just throw security buzzwords on their advertising without disclosing many, if any, details about what they are actually doing. They are probably doing virus scanning and looking for malicious activity, which all VPS should be doing anyway. In reality, any decent modern malware is going to be sending data over TLS and making it look like encrypted web traffic. Unless they are doing SSL proxying, they can't see into the traffic and can't possibly be providing any real service to you. Especially if they are charging extra for is. If they are doing SSL proxying, you should be concerned because then they can see into all of your encrypted web connections and see all kinds of sensitive data you probably don't want a VPN company having access to.

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