Tent Cities for the jobless now

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Saw a story on Cooper 360 interviewing people in Sacramento that have been living in tents due to no work, then found this online LINK

Pretty crazy, thought you guys would find it interesting.

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i live in sacramento. these people have been homeless long before the economy took a dump, and this "tent city" has bee... (more)

louieeG (Apr. 10, 2009 @ 11:57p) |

Are you talking about when LBJ used the US National Guard to protect white and black protestors marching from Selma to M... (more)

Xnarg (Apr. 11, 2009 @ 8:20a) |

By this measure, most people are only employed on the first and fifteenth of the month....

kamalktk (Apr. 11, 2009 @ 9:29a) |

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The phenomenon of encampments has caught advocacy groups somewhat by surprise, largely because of how quickly they have sprung up. "What you're seeing is encampments that I haven't seen since the 80s," said Paul Boden, executive director of the Western Regional Advocacy Project, an umbrella group for homeless advocacy organizations in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Oakland, Calif., Portland, Ore. and Seattle.

I had no idea the economy was that bad. I watch the news all the time and I have heard nothing about our economy failing. It's not like this nation has had rough times before and experienced spontaneous shanty towns.

that is sad

Dunno how bad this depression will end up being. Hope for the best but be prepared for the worst. I would recommend buying a gun and keeping it handy.

infowarsDOTcom said: Dunno how bad this depression will end up being. Hope for the best but be prepared for the worst. I would recommend buying a gun and keeping it handy.

Calling this a depression is a little over the top. We have 8% unemployment not 25% like we had during the great depression, there is still work out there and plenty of money to be made.

I go camping sometimes...how come I never get interviewed? I'll keep trying I guess.

California
is nice to the homeless
Californ-ya-ya
Super cool to the homeless

In the city
City of Santa Monica
Lots of rich people giving change to the homeless

In the city
City of brentwood
They take really good care
of all their homeless

In the city
Marina Del Rey
They're so nice to the homeless
built 'em port a potties

California
Super cool to the homeless
Californ-ya-ya
Is known for donor

In the city
City of Venice
Right by Matt's house
you can chill if your homeless

So the FWF lesson here is to invest in companies that produce tents. Or, look at the real estate opportunities. Buy a bunch of tents and rent them out for a few bucks a night.

If anyone is actually in this situation, a good website if information on how to survive and stay out of the law is http://freesleeping.blogspot.com.. This guy has been doing it for a few years off and on, in a car and now carless.

chimeer said: infowarsDOTcom said: Dunno how bad this depression will end up being. Hope for the best but be prepared for the worst. I would recommend buying a gun and keeping it handy.

Calling this a depression is a little over the top. We have 8% unemployment not 25% like we had during the great depression, there is still work out there and plenty of money to be made.


Unemployment was measured differently then. We're still not as bad as GD levels, but apples to apples we're at 15%.

There is a bright side! Camping is fun!

chimeer said: We have 8% unemployment not 25% like we had during the great depression, there is still work out there and plenty of money to be made.

At the risk of derailing the conversation with facts, there are structural differences between how the 8% is calculated now and the 25% was calculated then. It's not an apples-to-apples comparison.

Without getting into the various public policy reasons why the current method results in a lower number, let's just say that to get to a fair comparison you would need to add onto the 8% the number no longer working and the number who have taken part-time employment (even as little as an hour) but who really are still looking for full-time work.

If you gross-up the 8% to account for the calculation differences, then add in current projections for YE 2009 unemployment levels, you get 2010 numbers that really do start approaching that 25% level.

FWIW, if you go back to the depression-era WSJ articles, you will frequently read things like "there is still work out there and plenty of money to be made." Some very famous companies have their origins in the depression and fortunes were made, especially in war preparations. But the bottom line was that the period was wrenching and left a deep emotional impression on a generation of americans. There aren't that many folks left you lived thru those years, but it can be interesting to hear them tell first-hand remembrances of those years.

edit: There was some random goof who used to post here years ago (during the lower unemployment years) who periodically ranted about misleading he thought the official "jobless" figures had become.

I'm building a tree house, tents are for bums

blok said: I'm building a tree house, tents are for bums

protest something while your at it ... you might get some free sandwiches and media attention

Honestly, reading the article, I it sounds like the tent cities they profiled are anomalies, not a trend that is sweeping the nation.

The Reno tent city mentions a couple of factors - the closing of a winter shelter, a number of already-unemployed people who moved there to look for jobs, and what sounds like a homeless-services infrastructure that already was too small - they mention that the lot the tent city is on will be used to build a new shelter, which I'm guessing has probably been in planning for a while.

The Seattle ones sound like they always existed, but are being brought to attention because police are cracking down on them in areas that are gentrified.

Are there more homeless people now than there were when the economy was better? Probably. Are there significantly more, to the point that there will be tent cities springing up everywhere? Doubt it, at least in the near future.

they get great weather, and now they get to camp!
LUCKY!

Honestly, reading the article, I it sounds like the tent cities they profiled are anomalies, not a trend that is sweeping the nation.

Maybe, maybe just not yet. Remember that the tax credit you get for charitable donations is being reduced. I think it may be reasonable to assume that could have a great effect on many of the already struggling rescue missions and such.

For those unaware, Japan has had this issue for a long time ..... the 10 year technology lag is in effect with the economy as well?

MadAnthony said: Honestly, reading the article, I it sounds like the tent cities they profiled are anomalies, not a trend that is sweeping the nation.

The Reno tent city mentions a couple of factors - the closing of a winter shelter, a number of already-unemployed people who moved there to look for jobs, and what sounds like a homeless-services infrastructure that already was too small - they mention that the lot the tent city is on will be used to build a new shelter, which I'm guessing has probably been in planning for a while.

The Seattle ones sound like they always existed, but are being brought to attention because police are cracking down on them in areas that are gentrified.

Are there more homeless people now than there were when the economy was better? Probably. Are there significantly more, to the point that there will be tent cities springing up everywhere? Doubt it, at least in the near future.


i agree, but i wouldnt doubt if this becomes more common, that and 10 people living in 2 bedroom houses

These are the shanty towns of the developed world!

chimeer said: Calling this a depression is a little over the top. We have 8% unemployment not 25% like we had during the great depression, there is still work out there and plenty of money to be made.

We had 8.1 % unemployment at the end of February and the percentage will increase going forward. Last time I checked, government did not put a freeze on declaring unemployment.

As I said earlier, hope for the best but be prepared for the worst.
Buy a gun for your family's safety and protection.

"It's clear that poverty and homelessness have increased," said Michael Stoops, acting executive director of the coalition. "The economy is in chaos, we're in an unofficial recession and Americans are worried, from the homeless to the middle class, about their future."

Economy is not in chaos. It's not doing great but it's not chaos. Based on my personal experience economy was in chaos in Russia in the 90's, Germany in the 30's from what I heard/read, Great Depression perhaps fits the chaos category but definetely not the present situation.

Another typical example of sensationalism from the news media. They take a real but non-typical event, report on it and make you beleive that life sucks, economy is in chaos and we are all gonna die.

MadAnthony said: Honestly, reading the article, I it sounds like the tent cities they profiled are anomalies, not a trend that is sweeping the nation.

All trends start as anomalies.

infowarsDOTcom said:
Buy a gun for your family's safety and protection.


You know, you've probably made your point sufficiently with the gun stuff.

If you really want to make responsible suggestions regarding members' families, why don't you at least add the phrase "and gun training" to your exhortation?

And, yes, I've got the NRA card and plenty of awards in the box. I'm also someone who nearly got shot by a groggy family member on sleeping aids who keep a revolver in the nightstand.

Is FEMA constructing these 'villes?

swandown said: MadAnthony said: Honestly, reading the article, I it sounds like the tent cities they profiled are anomalies, not a trend that is sweeping the nation.

All trends start as anomalies.


But not all anomalies become trends.

MadAnthony said: swandown said: MadAnthony said: Honestly, reading the article, I it sounds like the tent cities they profiled are anomalies, not a trend that is sweeping the nation.

All trends start as anomalies.


But not all anomalies become trends.


Don't worry. Some tent owners will demand bigger tents with granite countertop soon.

From former NAR National Association of Realtors Chief Economist David Lereah circa 2005;

"It's a new paradigm, and everybody who doesn't buy, now, will be priced out forever. Anybody who does buy will be rewarded with a lifetime of riches, as their property will continue its 30% yearly price increase. Renters, and anybody born in a future generation, will not be able to afford a $10,000,000 starter home in 15 years. They will live in tent cities, and Hondas. This asset bubble is different than all of the others - it will never slow down, or pop. The gains are permanent."

I guess he had one thing right...



If anyone's interested in more from this genius, you could check out some of his classic works found collecting dust in bookstores;

"Are you missing the real estate boom?" 2005
"Why the Real Estate Boom Will Not Bust" 2006
"The Rules for Growing Rich: Making Money in the New Information Economy" 2000. A timely piece on how to get rich investing in dot-com stocks.

There is already an extablished tent city in Hawaii, people actually register with the local government and receive a free tent and make new homes on the beaches.

inda said: There is already an extablished tent city in Hawaii, people actually register with the local government and receive a free tent and make new homes on the beaches.

your joking?

Send the NAR economist to the tent city!

didn't some former president send in the Marines last time this happened?

Breadlines are already forming in San Diego.

link

The article linked in the OP would have you believe that tent cities like the one in downtown Reno, featured in the article, are springing up all over the country.

I have seen mention of this same exact tent city in media articles and TV reports for a few months now. It's always the same tent city. Media hype? Or do similar tent cities actually exist elsewhere?

They've existed for decades in one form or another, particulary for migrant farm laborers out west.

mapen said: The article linked in the OP would have you believe that tent cities like the one in downtown Reno, featured in the article, are springing up all over the country.

I have seen mention of this same exact tent city in media articles and TV reports for a few months now. It's always the same tent city. Media hype? Or do similar tent cities actually exist elsewhere?


There is, or at least was one other large tent city in CA that I know of. In Ontario, but that was over 6 months ago. Last I heard the city was shutting them down. There are numerous small tent cities all over southern CA that you'll never hear about. Also, if you go to just about any Wal-Mart parking lot at night in CA, you will find many living in their vehicles.

Unless (until?) we start seeing massive layoffs in government workers (school district, local, state, federal), the near-term situation will not be as dire as it was during the Great Depression. A far larger percentage of households now have at least one government worker which provides a buffer of sorts. For example, public school teachers (well over three million) outnumber workers in the steel, chemical, oil, rubber, plastic, and paper industries combined. The workforce looks a lot different than it did 80 years ago.

Not to say that's not coming, California is laying off some state employees, maybe other states are, too, but government employees may be among the last groups affected on a large scale by the economy and it doesn't seem like the government would be spending a trillion dollars to "stimulate" jobs in the private sector only to make large, wholesale cuts in the government sector, not a huge focus on "smaller government" these days. We'll go deeper into debt before significantly reducing the size of government, which will come back to haunt us in the future for sure but not right away. Some states will be squeezed more than others though (i.e. California).

guruganesha said: didn't some former president send in the Marines last time this happened?

I think you might be thinking of the Bonus Army (Wikipedia). As far as I know, it's the only time regular US Army forces have been used against US citizens within our borders since Reconstruction and the Posse Comitatus Act of 1878.

Agree with earlier posters on measuring unemployment. U-3 is headline unemployment, and includes only people who are unemployed and actively looking for full-time employment. U-6 is closer to what was used in the 1930s, which includes all those included in U-3, plus part-time workers who are part-time for economic reasons (can't find full-time work), and individuals who have given up looking for work but indicate that they are available for full-time employment.

Table of unemployment measures

For more info check out the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

I've taken a wrong turn at night in Los Angeles and seen a street full of tents.

Skipping 17 Messages...
brettdoyle said:
A real estate agent or home builder that doesn't make any money because houses aren't selling. This person has no income, but isn't considered unemployed because the government never considered them to be employed.

By this measure, most people are only employed on the first and fifteenth of the month....



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